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        Attentional function in secondary school students receiving isoniazid prophylaxis for tuberculosis infection
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        Attentional function in secondary school students receiving isoniazid prophylaxis for tuberculosis infection
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        Attentional function in secondary school students receiving isoniazid prophylaxis for tuberculosis infection
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Abstract

Reports have suggested that isoniazid treatment may be associated with poor concentration and subtle reduction in memory. This study examines attentional function and processing speed in a group of 25 adolescents who received isoniazid prophylaxis for at least 6 months. As adolescents often face major educational assessment milestones, such cognitive side effects may have important implications. Participants were assessed before treatment, 1 month into treatment and at least 1 week after treatment cessation. Measures included the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test and subtests of the appropriate Wechsler scale sensitive to attention and speed of information processing. Isoniazid does not appear to cause significant adverse effects on attentional function in adolescents.