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The association of cellulitis incidence and meteorological factors in Taiwan

  • Ren-Jun Hsu (a1) (a2) (a3), Chia-Cheng Chou (a4), Jui-Ming Liu (a1) (a5) (a6), See-Tong Pang (a7), Chien-Yu Lin (a8), Heng-Chang Chuang (a6), Cheng-Keng Chuang (a7), Hsiao-Wei Wang (a9), Ying-Hsu Chang (a7) and Po-Hung Lin (a7) (a10)...

Abstract

Cellulitis is a common infection of the skin and soft tissue. Susceptibility to cellulitis is related to microorganism virulence, the host immunity status and environmental factors. This retrospective study from 2001 to 2013 investigated relationships between the monthly incidence rate of cellulitis and meteorological factors using data from the Taiwanese Health Insurance Dataset and the Taiwanese Central Weather Bureau. Meteorological data included temperature, hours of sunshine, relative humidity, total rainfall and total number of rainy days. In otal, 195 841 patients were diagnosed with cellulitis and the incidence rate was strongly correlated with temperature (γS = 0.84, P < 0.001), total sunshine hours (γS = 0.65, P < 0.001) and total rainfall (γS = 0.53, P < 0.001). The incidence rate of cellulitis increased by 3.47/100 000 cases for every 1° elevation in environmental temperature. Our results may assist clinicians in educating the public of the increased risk of cellulitis during warm seasons and possible predisposing environmental factors for infection.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Dr Po-Hung Lin, E-mail: m7587@adm.cgmh.org.tw

Footnotes

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Ren-Jun Hsu and Chia-Cheng Chou contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

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