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Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections between 1987 and 2000, including β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant strains

  • L. QIN (a1), H. WATANABE (a2), N. ASOH (a2), K. WATANABE (a2), K. OISHI (a2), T. MIZOTA (a1) and T. NAGATAKE (a2)...

Summary

The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of five antibiotics and the presence of resistance genes was determined in 163 Haemophilus influenzae isolates collected over 13 years (1987–2000) in four two-yearly sampling periods from patients with respiratory tract infections. The prevalence of β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-susceptible strains was approximately 80% over the sampling period although fewer strains (65·9%) were recovered in the period 1995–1997. TEM-1 type β-lactamase-producing strains were less frequent starting at 15·6% and declining to 2·2% in the final sampling period. Low-β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) strains were uncommon in 1987–1989 (2·2%), peaked to 19·5% in 1995–1997, but fell back to 11·1% by 2000. Fully BLNAR strains were not detected until the last sampling period (6·7%). The MICs of ampicillin, levofloxacin, cefditoren and ceftriaxone remained stable but there was an eight-fold increase in the MIC of cefdinir over the sampling period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA digests showed that three representative BLNAR strains were genetically distinct and 11 DNA profiles were identified among 17 low-BLNAR strains. These data suggest that the number of genetically altered BLNAR and low-BLNAR strains are increasing in Japan.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr H. Watanabe, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan. (Email: h-wata@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp)

References

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Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections between 1987 and 2000, including β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant strains

  • L. QIN (a1), H. WATANABE (a2), N. ASOH (a2), K. WATANABE (a2), K. OISHI (a2), T. MIZOTA (a1) and T. NAGATAKE (a2)...

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