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An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections following a dairy education school field trip in Washington state, 2015

  • K. G. Curran (a1), K. E. Heiman Marshall (a2), T. Singh (a2), Z. Doobovsky (a2), J. Hensley (a3), B. Melius (a4), L. Whitlock (a2), L. Stevenson (a5), J. Leinbach (a3), H. Oltean (a4), W. A. Glover (a6), T. Kunesh (a3), S. Lindquist (a4), I. Williams (a2) and M. Nichols (a2)...

Abstract

On 27 April 2015, Washington health authorities identified Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections associated with dairy education school field trips held in a barn 20–24 April. Investigation objectives were to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, identify the source of infection, prevent secondary illness transmission and develop recommendations to prevent future outbreaks. Case-finding, hypothesis generating interviews, environmental site visits and a case–control study were conducted. Parents and children were interviewed regarding event activities. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed. Environmental testing was conducted in the barn; isolates were compared to patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sixty people were ill, 11 (18%) were hospitalised and six (10%) developed haemolytic uremic syndrome. Ill people ranged in age from <1 year to 47 years (median: 7), and 20 (33%) were female. Twenty-seven case-patients and 88 controls were enrolled in the case–control study. Among first-grade students, handwashing (i.e. soap and water, or hand sanitiser) before lunch was protective (adjusted OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.02–0.88, P = 0.04). Barn samples yielded E. coli O157:H7 with PFGE patterns indistinguishable from patient isolates. This investigation provided epidemiological, laboratory and environmental evidence for a large outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections from exposure to a contaminated barn. The investigation highlights the often overlooked risk of infection through exposure to animal environments as well as the importance of handwashing for disease prevention. Increased education and encouragement of infection prevention measures, such as handwashing, can prevent illness.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: K. G. Curran, E-mail: ydh9@cdc.gov

References

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