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Acute gastrointestinal illness in New Zealand: a community study

  • S. B. ADLAM (a1), S. PERERA (a1), R. J. LAKE (a2), D. M. CAMPBELL (a3), J. A. WILLIMAN (a1) and M. G. BAKER (a4)...

Summary

We report the results of the New Zealand Acute Gastrointestinal Illness (AGI) Community Study, a representative cross-sectional community telephone survey of 3655 participants conducted over a 12-month period. Respondents were asked questions about vomiting and diarrhoea in the previous 4 weeks. At least one episode of diarrhoea and/or vomiting was reported by 8·6% of respondents, an incidence of 1·11 episodes/person per year. Prevalence was highest in children aged <5 years and lowest in those aged >64 years. The mean duration of illness was 2·5 days and most common symptoms were diarrhoea (82·5%), stomach cramps (75·7%), nausea (56·9%) and vomiting (49·0%). Extrapolation of the adjusted estimates indicates there are about 4·66 million episodes of AGI per year in New Zealand, nearly 1 million visits to the general medical practitioner, in excess of 300 000 courses of antibiotics being dispensed and more than 4·5 million days of paid work lost due to AGI. This represents a significant burden of disease.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr R. J. Lake, Institute of Environmental Science and Research, PO Box 29-181, Christchurch 8540, New Zealand. (Email: rob.lake@esr.cri.nz)

References

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Acute gastrointestinal illness in New Zealand: a community study

  • S. B. ADLAM (a1), S. PERERA (a1), R. J. LAKE (a2), D. M. CAMPBELL (a3), J. A. WILLIMAN (a1) and M. G. BAKER (a4)...

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