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A 10-year analysis of VTEC microbiological clearance times, in the under-six population of the Midlands, Ireland

  • A. COLLINS (a1), U. B. FALLON (a1), M. COSGROVE (a1), G. MEAGHER (a1) and C. NI SHUILEABHAN (a1)...

Summary

Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) is a significant problem in the under-six population in the Midlands, Ireland. VTEC spreads by person-to-person transmission and children attending childcare facilities are excluded until they achieve two consecutive negative stool samples. This report analyses 10 years data on the number of days children under the age of six take to microbiologically clear VTEC. We identified from our data that the median clearance time for VTEC was 39 days, interquartile range (IQR) 27–56 days, maximum clearance time 283 days. At 70 days from onset of infection, 90% of children had cleared the infection. These findings were slightly more prolonged but consistent with international literature on VTEC clearance times for children. Asymptomatic children cleared VTEC infection significantly faster (median time 25 days IQR 13–43 days) than symptomatic children (median time 43 days IQR 31–58 days). Symptomatic children older than 1 year of age cleared VTEC infection significantly faster (median time 42 days IQR 31–57) than symptomatic children year under 1 year (median time 56 days IQR 35–74 days). This report identifies clear data which can be used to more accurately advise parents on time periods required to achieve microbiological clearance from VTEC.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr. A. Collins, Department of Public Health, HSE-DML, HSE Area Office, Ardan Road, Tullamore, Co. Offaly, Ireland. (Email: abigail.collins@hse.ie)

References

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