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ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEWS AND CASE STUDIES: A Plan for Nature in Glenview: Creating and Implementing a Natural Resources Plan at the Community Level

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 March 2012

Robyn Flakne
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Manager, Village of Glenview, Glenview, Illinois
Robert Keller
Affiliation:
Formerly, Ecological Restoration Intern, Village of Glenview, Glenview, Illinois
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Abstract

Green infrastructure planning at the community level is explored through a description of the development and implementation of a natural resources plan for the Village of Glenview, a Chicago suburb. The plan grew from previous investments in natural resources, such as zoning and ordinance protection and the redevelopment of a 1,121-acre naval air station in the village. Projects originating from the plan have included streambank stabilizations, detention basin naturalizations, rain gardens, remeandering and naturalization of a reach of the West Fork of the North Branch of the Chicago River, and public outreach efforts. Keys to the plan's creation and implementation to date include official incorporation of a politically sophisticated Natural Resources Commission into local government, thorough ecological assessment of existing natural resources, grant funding and political viability due to the coincidence of habitat- and water-quality improvement goals, consistency with regional plans, peer recognition, and efforts to secure public acceptance through private landowner incentives, volunteer workdays, and communications campaigns. Barriers to full implementation include diverse public and private ownership of desirable natural resources, limited funding for natural resources capital projects, and an implementation plan not officially adopted by the village board of trustees.

Environmental Practice 14:1–10 (2012)

Type
Features
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Environmental Professionals 2012

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