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Local plant species depletion in a tropical dry deciduous forest of northern India

  • R. SAGAR (a1) and J.S. SINGH (a1)

Abstract

The dry tropical ecosystems are among the world's most threatened, and the dry deciduous forest of northern India is being progressively converted to scrub, savannah and grasslands through industrialization, agriculture, fuelwood collection, lopping of trees for fodder and severe grazing/browsing. This habitat destruction threatens the survival of many species. This study examined the demographic instability of tree species in 3-ha permanent plots: at five sites differing in the degree of disturbance. Based on the proportion of seedlings of a species in its total population (seedling + sapling + adults), about 52% of the total 65 species exhibited local demographic instability, and at one or more sites a single individual represented 10 species. The increase in the proportion of declining species with increase in disturbance intensity indicated that local anthropogenic pressure is responsible for the depletion. Apart from stronger protection measures, it is necessary to encourage fuelwood plantations, develop village pastures and reduce livestock numbers.

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Corresponding author

Correspondence: Professor J.S. Singh Fax: +91 542 2368174 e-mail: jssingh@bhu.ac.in

Keywords

Local plant species depletion in a tropical dry deciduous forest of northern India

  • R. SAGAR (a1) and J.S. SINGH (a1)

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