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Conservation Education Programmes: Evaluate and Improve Them

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2009

Susan K. Jacobson
Affiliation:
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27706, USA.

Extract

Evaluation of the conservation education programme at Kinabalu Park in Malaysia demonstrated the importance of such evaluation in determining a programme's worth and providing due observation of feedback and opportunity for improvement. The goal of the programme was to foster more favourable attitudes towards the park system and the conservation of natural resources than formerly prevailed among local villagers. The programme was formally evaluated by using a survey instrument in the form of a mobile unit's questionnaire that had been designed to obtain information about shifts in villagers' attitudes towards the Park before and after exposure to the conservation programme.

Type
Main Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Foundation for Environmental Conservation 1987

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References

Bennett, D.B. (1974). Evaluating environmental education programs. Pp. 113–64 in Environmental Education, Strategies Toward a More Livable Future (Eds Swan, J.A. & Stapp, W.B.). Halsted Press, New York, NY, USA: 349 pp., illustr.Google Scholar
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