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Exploring Teachers’ Actions to Promote Self-Regulated Learning Practices in Primary School

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2015

Koen Lombaerts
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Nadine Engels
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Johan Vanderfaeillie
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Corresponding
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Abstract

Research highlights the importance of designing primary school classroom environments that promote self-regulated learning (SRL). Teachers play a crucial part as learning process facilitators in the development of pupils’ self-regulated learning competence and skills. The aim of this study was to explore teachers’ actions towards the development of self-regulated learning practices in primary school. The results of a survey of 399 primary school teachers in Brussels and the surrounding area (Belgium, Europe) are presented. Findings appeared to be consistent with theoretical assumptions about the development of self-regulated learning suggesting that teachers gradually introduce SRL over primary school grades. When comparing both groups of teachers scoring high and low in stimulating pupils’ self-regulated learning, similar patterns of SRL encouragement were recorded. Furthermore, teachers were found to promote self-regulated learning as a total concept with a comparable emphasis on all phases of the self-regulated learning process. The adjustment of the teaching environment was found to be similar in all grades and for both high and low self-regulated learning practices.

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Australian Psychological Society 2007

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