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Medical Response to a Nuclear Detonation: Creating a Playbook for State and Local Planners and Responders

  • Paula Murrain-Hill, C. Norman Coleman, John L. Hick, Irwin Redlener, David M. Weinstock, John F. Koerner, Delaine Black, Melissa Sanders, Judith L. Bader, Joseph Forsha and Ann R. Knebel...

Abstract

For efficient and effective medical responses to mass casualty events, detailed advanced planning is required. For federal responders, this is an ongoing responsibility. The US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) prepares playbooks with formal, written plans that are reviewed, updated, and exercised regularly. Recognizing that state and local responders with fewer resources may be helped in creating their own event-specific response plans, subject matter experts from the range of sectors comprising the Scarce Resources for a Nuclear Detonation Project, provided for this first time a state and local planner's playbook template for responding to a nuclear detonation. The playbook elements are adapted from DHHS playbooks with appropriate modification for state and local planners. Individualization by venue is expected, reflecting specific assets, populations, geography, preferences, and expertise. This playbook template is designed to be a practical tool with sufficient background information and options for step-by-step individualized planning and response.

(Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2011;5:S89-S97)

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Address correspondence and reprint requests to Paula Murrain-Hill, Hubert H. Humphrey Bldg, 200 Independence Ave SW, Suite 638G, Washington, DC 20201 (e-mail: Paula.Murrain-Hill@hhs.gov).

References

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