Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The H1N1 Crisis: A Case Study of the Integration of Mental and Behavioral Health in Public Health Crises

Abstract

In substantial numbers of affected populations, disasters adversely affect well-being and influence the development of emotional problems and dysfunctional behaviors. Nowhere is the integration of mental and behavioral health into broader public health and medical preparedness and response activities more crucial than in disasters such as the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The National Biodefense Science Board, recognizing that the mental and behavioral health responses to H1N1 were vital to preserving safety and health for the country, requested that the Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee recommend actions for public health officials to prevent and mitigate adverse behavioral health outcomes during the H1N1 pandemic. The subcommittee's recommendations emphasized vulnerable populations and concentrated on interventions, education and training, and communication and messaging. The subcommittee's H1N1 activities and recommendations provide an approach and template for identifying and addressing future efforts related to newly emerging public health and medical emergencies. The many emotional and behavioral health implications of the crisis and the importance of psychological factors in determining the behavior of members of the public argue for a programmatic integration of behavioral health and science expertise in a comprehensive public health response.

(Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2012;6:67–71)

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The H1N1 Crisis: A Case Study of the Integration of Mental and Behavioral Health in Public Health Crises
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The H1N1 Crisis: A Case Study of the Integration of Mental and Behavioral Health in Public Health Crises
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The H1N1 Crisis: A Case Study of the Integration of Mental and Behavioral Health in Public Health Crises
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Betty Pfefferbaum, MD, JD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, PO Box 26901-WP 3470, Oklahoma City, OK 73126-0901 (e-mail: Betty-Pfefferbaum@ouhsc.edu).

References

Hide All
1.Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act. 42 USC 201, Public L No. 109-417, 120 Stat 2831. December 19, 2006. http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=109_cong_public_laws&docid=f:publ417.109.pdf. Accessed January 30, 2012.
2.US Department of Health and Human Services. Amended Charter, National Biodefense Science Board; September 24, 2010. http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/boards/nbsb/Documents/amendcharter-nbsb-2010.pdf. Accessed January 30, 2012.
3.US Department of Homeland Security. Homeland Security Presidential Directive 21. Public Health and Medical Preparedness; October 18, 2007. http://www.dhs.gov/xabout/laws/gc_1219263961449.shtm. Accessed January 30, 2012.
4.Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Biodefense Science Board. US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Disaster Mental Health Recommendations. Report of the Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Biodefense Science Board; November 18, 2008. http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/boards/nbsb/Documents/nsbs-dmhreport-final.pdf. Accessed January 30, 2012.
5.National Biodefense Science Board, US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Letter to The Honorable Michael O. Leavitt, Secretary of Health and Human Services; November 19, 2008. http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/boards/nbsb/Documents/nbsb-dmhrecs-081118.pdf. Accessed January 30, 2012.
6.Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Biodefense Science Board, US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Integration of Mental and Behavioral Health in Federal Disaster Preparedness, Response, and Recovery: Assessment and Recommendations; September 22, 2010. http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/boards/nbsb/meetings/Documents/dmhreport1010.pdf. Accessed January 30, 2012.
7.Pfefferbaum, BP, Flynn, BW, Schonfeld, D, et alThe integration of mental and behavioral health into disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2012;6 (1):6066.
8.National Biodefense Science Board, US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Letter to The Honorable Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services; September 22, 2010. http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/boards/nbsb/meetings/Documents/92210dmhltrsec.pdf. Accessed January 30, 2012.
9.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The 2009 H1N1 Pandemic. Summary Highlights, April 2009 - April 2010. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/cdcresponse.htm. Accessed January 30, 2012.
10.Smith, GJD, Vijaykrishna, D, Bahl, J, et alOrigins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A epidemic. Nature. 2009;459 (7250):11221125.
11.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated CDC Estimates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths in the United States, April 2009 – April 10, 2010. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/estimates_2009_h1n1.htm. Accessed January 30, 2012.
12.Harris, KM, Maurer, J, Kellermann, AL.Influenza vaccine--safe, effective, and mistrusted. N Engl J Med. 2010;363 (23):21832185.
13.Maurer, J, Uscher-Pines, L, Harris, KM.Perceived seriousness of seasonal and A(H1N1) influenzas, attitudes toward vaccination, and vaccine uptake among U.S. adults: does the source of information matter? Prev Med. 2010;51 (2):185187.
14.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Interim results. Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccination coverage—United States, October-December 2009. Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep. 2010;59:1-5. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm59e0115.pdf. Accessed January 30, 2012.
15.US Department of Health and Human Services. Know What to Do About the Flu. Flu.gov Webcasts. http://www.flu.gov/video/. Accessed January 30, 2012.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed