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Evaluation and Gap Analysis of Pediatric Disaster Preparedness Resources

  • Tessa J. Koeffler (a1), Natalie E. Demeter (a2), Lynn Kysh (a3), Jeffrey Reeb (a4) (a5), Alix Stayton (a4), Robert Spears (a4) and Rita V. Burke (a1) (a2) (a4)...

Abstract

The goal of this research was to identify, summarize, and evaluate pediatric disaster preparedness resources in the United States and to identify areas that need improvement or further development. Using standard literature, gray literature and website reviews, relevant resources were identified and the 50 most relevant resources were studied in depth. Each resource was given a grade of A, B, or C based on content, format, quality, and thoroughness. These resources were divided into 3 categories: (1) hospital resources, (2) school resources, and (3) training/education resources. Half of the 50 resources (25) were given a grade of A, indicating the highest level of quality and thoroughness, with pertinent information presented in a clear format. Sixteen of the resources were given a rating of B, while 9 of the resources were given a rating of C. Over 60% of the resources did not contain culturally sensitive information and more than 60% of the resources did not contain preparedness information for children with disabilities. Resources specific to hospitals and schools were limited in number and quality available, while training/education resources were widely available. In addition, 60% of resources were not specific to schools, children’s hospitals, or to certain occupations (ie, nurses, doctors, teachers, principals). Based on these results, gaps in cultural sensitivity were identified and limitations in resources for children with disabilities and for schools and hospitals currently exist. All these areas require further development in the field of pediatric disaster preparedness (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2019;13:330–337)

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and reprint requests to Rita V. Burke, PhD, MPH, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Mailstop #100, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA (e-mail: riburke@chla.usc.edu)

References

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