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Comparison of Disaster Preparedness Between Urban and Rural Community Hospitals in New York State

  • Dan J. Vick (a1), Asa B. Wilson (a2), Michael Fisher (a3) and Carrie Roseamelia (a4)

Abstract

Objective

The intent of this study was to determine whether there are differences in disaster preparedness between urban and rural community hospitals across New York State.

Methods

Descriptive and analytical cross-sectional survey study of 207 community hospitals; thirty-five questions evaluated 6 disaster preparedness elements: disaster plan development, on-site surge capacity, available materials and resources, disaster education and training, disaster preparedness funding levels, and perception of disaster preparedness.

Results

Completed surveys were received from 48 urban hospitals and 32 rural hospitals.There were differences in disaster preparedness between urban and rural hospitals with respect to disaster plan development, on-site surge capacity, available materials and resources, disaster education and training, and perception of disaster preparedness. No difference was identified between these hospitals with respect to disaster preparedness funding levels.

Conclusions

The results of this study provide an assessment of the current state of disaster preparedness in urban and rural community hospitals in New York. Differences in preparedness between the two settings may reflect differing priorities with respect to perceived threats, as well as opportunities for improvement that may require additional advocacy and legislation. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2019;13:424-428)

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and reprint requests to Dan J. Vick, 7866 Scottsdale Drive, Newburgh, IN 47630 (e-mail: djvick615@hotmail.com)

References

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