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Economics of decriminalizing mental illness: when doing the right thing costs less

  • Darci Delgado (a1), Ashley Breth (a1), Shelley Hill (a1) (a2), Katherine Warburton (a1) (a2) and Stephen M. Stahl (a1) (a3)...

Abstract

The United States’ criminal justice system has seen exponential growth in costs related to the incarceration of persons with mental illness. Jails, prisons, and state hospitals’ resources are insufficient to adequately treat the sheer number of individuals cycling through their system. Reversing the cycle of criminalization of mental illness is a complicated process, but mental health diversion programs across the nation are uniquely positioned to do just that. Not only are these programs providing humane treatment to individuals within the community and breaking the cycle of recidivism, the potential fiscal savings are over 1 billion dollars.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Darci Delgado (Email: darci.delgado@dsh.ca.gov)

Footnotes

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The findings and conclusions in “Economics of decriminalizing mental illness: when doing the right thing costs less” are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the California Department of State Hospitals or the California Health and Human Services Agency.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Economics of decriminalizing mental illness: when doing the right thing costs less

  • Darci Delgado (a1), Ashley Breth (a1), Shelley Hill (a1) (a2), Katherine Warburton (a1) (a2) and Stephen M. Stahl (a1) (a3)...

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