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Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes in a Patient with Migraine Attack and Transient Global Amnesia After Cardiac Catheterization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

The presence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in patients with transient global amnesia has been an interesting phenomenologic finding. Several theories surround the occurrence of this syndrome, but little is known about its true physiopathology. We present a case of transient global amnesia after cardiac catheterization associated with migraine headache and MRI changes compatible with an ischemic insult. A discussion on potential explanations for this finding is made, as well as a review of the pertinent literature.

Type
Case Report
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2005

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References

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes in a Patient with Migraine Attack and Transient Global Amnesia After Cardiac Catheterization
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