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Mineral composition of the average shale

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2018

D. H. Yaaton*
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem
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Abstract

Mineralogical compositions have been calculated from a number of average analyses of shales and clays using the scheme of Imbrie and Poldervaart (1959). The average shale comprises 59 per cent. clay minerals, 20 per cent. quartz and chert, 8 per cent. felspars, 7 per cent. carbonates, 3 per cent. iron oxide minerals, 1 per cent. organic matter and 2 per cent. other minerals. Illite predominates among the clay minerals.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 1962

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References

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