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Two Lines of Eumelus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2009

C. M. Bowra
Affiliation:
Wadham College, Oxford

Extract

Among the scanty remains of poetry attributed to Eumelus of Corinth two lines (fr. 13 Kinkel, fr. 1 Bergk, Diehl, Edmonds, fr. 696/1 Page)2 stand out as different from the rest, first because they are concerned not with the legendary past but with an actual, present occasion, and secondly because they are composed not for Corinthians but for Messenians. Our evidence comes from Pausanias and may be set out at the start:

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Copyright © The Classical Association 1963

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References

page 145 note 1 I am deeply indebted to Professor A. Andrewes and Mr. W. G. Forrest for help and criticism.

page 145 note 2 In recent years the fragment has not been the subject of much discussion. The best treatment of it is still that of Smyth, H. W., Greek Melic Poets, pp. 163–4.Google Scholar See also Schmid-Stählin, , Gesch. d. gr. Lit. I i, pp. 291Google Scholar; Flach, H., Gesch. d. gr. Lyr., pp. 9394Google Scholar; Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, U. von, Textg. d. gr. Lyr., pp. 3839Google Scholar; Wellman, M., R.-E. vi. 1081Google Scholar; R. Muth, ibid. xxiii. 862; Dunbabin, T. J., J.H.S. lxviii (1948), 67Google Scholar; Huxley, G. L., Early Sparta, p. 114 n. 119.Google Scholar

page 145 note 3 Smyth, , op. cit., p. 164.Google Scholar

page 146 note 1 Färber, H., Die Lyrik in der Kunsttheorie der Antike i. 4849; ii. 29–30.Google Scholar

page 146 note 2 See especially Jacoby, F., F. Gr. Hist. iii a, pp. 136ff.Google Scholar

page 147 note 1 Toepfer, H., R.-E. ii. 2783 ff.Google Scholar; Ure, P. N., The Origin of Tyranny, pp. 192ff.Google Scholar; Len-schau, T., R.-E. Supp. iv 1013ff.Google Scholar; Andrewes, A., The Greek Tyrants, pp. 4349.Google Scholar

page 147 note 2 Pollard, J., A.B.S.A. lv (1960), i98ff.Google Scholar

page 147 note 3 Payne, H., Necrocorinthia, p. 351, ascribes the Chest to the first quarter of the sixth century.Google Scholar

page 148 note 1 E. Bethe, R.-E. vi. 1080.

page 148 note 2 Wilamowitz, , Textg. d. gr. Lyr. p. 38.Google Scholar

page 148 note 3 Alcman commonly uses the termination and this perhaps illustrates the description of him by Apollonius Dyscolus 1. 1.107. 13 Schneider-Uhlig as

page 149 note 1 It is true that at fr. 44. 12 L.-P. Sappho writes but this poem is full of anomalies, and this is one of them. See E. Lobel, pp.xiv–xv.

page 149 note 2 As Professor K. J. Dover points out to me, appears also in Democritus (fr. 277 D.-K.) and Antiphon the Sophist (fr. 49 D.-K.) and in Herodotus (7. 168. 2) and both words may be Ionic rather than epic. I suggest that the first may well be an epic form and the second modelled on it later.

page 149 note 3 Buck, C. D., Greek Dialects2, p. 4.Google Scholar

page 149 note 4 Färber, , op. cit. i. 4849, ii. 2930Google Scholar

page 150 note 1 Dunbabin, T. J., J.H.S. lxviii (1948), 67Google Scholar, with a reservation in n. 71, suggests that the lines may have been written before the war. Huxley, G. L., Early Sparta, p. 114, n. 199Google Scholar puts them in the generation before the outbreak.

page 150 note 2 The date cannot be fixed at all exactly, but, since Thucydides attributes the hymn to Homer (3. 104. 4), it must be of considerable antiquity.

page 151 note 1 Smyth, op. cit., sees that there is a difficulty, but his solution, which is to translate as ‘became’, is against usage and does not make any clear point. He also thinks that the Muse is that of the Delian Apollo, but she must be Messenian.

page 152 note 1 Dunbabin, T.J., The Western Greeks, p. 13.Google Scholar

page 152 note 2 Kroymann, L., Sparta und Messenien, p. 11.Google Scholar See also Wade-Gery, H. T., C.A.H.1 iii 537.Google Scholar

page 153 note 1 Andrewes, A., The Greek Tyrants, p. 40.Google Scholar

page 153 note 2 Forrest, W. G., Historia vi (1957), 160–75.Google Scholar

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