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Virtual reality curriculum increases paediatric residents’ knowledge of CHDs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 April 2022

Tiffany R. Lim*
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine Congenital Heart Center, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Hunter C. Wilson
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine Congenital Heart Center, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
David M. Axelrod
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA
David K. Werho
Affiliation:
University of California San Diego, Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
Stephanie S. Handler
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA
Sunkyung Yu
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine Congenital Heart Center, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Katherine Afton
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine Congenital Heart Center, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Ray Lowery
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine Congenital Heart Center, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Patricia B. Mullan
Affiliation:
University of Michigan Department of Learning Health Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
James Cooke
Affiliation:
University of Michigan Department of Learning Health Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Michigan Medicine Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Sonal T. Owens
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine Congenital Heart Center, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Tiffany R. Lim, MD, Children’s Heart Center of Central Oregon, 2041 NE Williamson Ct, Bend, OR 97701, USA. Tel: +1 (541) 639 8333; Fax: (541)507-9181. E-mail: tiffanyrlim@gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives:

Virtual reality has emerged as a unique educational modality for medical trainees. However, incorporation of virtual reality curricula into formal training programmes has been limited. We describe a multi-centre effort to develop, implement, and evaluate the efficacy of a virtual reality curriculum for residents participating in paediatric cardiology rotations.

Methods:

A virtual reality software program (“The Stanford Virtual Heart”) was utilised. Users are placed “inside the heart” and explore non-traditional views of cardiac anatomy. Modules for six common congenital heart lesions were developed, including narrative scripts. A prospective case–control study was performed involving three large paediatric residency programmes. From July 2018 to June 2019, trainees participating in an outpatient cardiology rotation completed a 27-question, validated assessment tool. From July 2019 to February 2020, trainees completed the virtual reality curriculum and assessment tool during their cardiology rotation. Qualitative feedback on the virtual reality experience was also gathered. Intervention and control group performances were compared using univariate analyses.

Results:

There were 80 trainees in the control group and 52 in the intervention group. Trainees in the intervention group achieved higher scores on the assessment (20.4 ± 2.9 versus 18.8 ± 3.8 out of 27 questions answered correctly, p = 0.01). Further analysis showed significant improvement in the intervention group for questions specifically testing visuospatial concepts. In total, 100% of users recommended integration of the programme into the residency curriculum.

Conclusions:

Virtual reality is an effective and well-received adjunct to clinical curricula for residents participating in paediatric cardiology rotations. Our results support continued virtual reality use and expansion to include other trainees.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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