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Transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defects in children less than 10 kg: experience from a tertiary care referral hospital in Eastern India

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2021

Mahua Roy
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata, India
Debasree Gangopadhyay*
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata, India
Noopur Goyal
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata, India
Savita Murthy
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata, India
Debabrata Nandi
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata, India
Biswajit Bandyopadhyay
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata, India
Joyeeta Dutta
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Intensive Care, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata, India
*
Author for correspondence: Debasree Gangopadhyay, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Kolkata. 124 Mukundapur, Kolkata700099, India. Tel: 9088846746. E-mail: debasreeganguly23@gmail.com

Abstract

Objective:

To assess the feasibility of percutaneous transcatheter device closure of ventricular septal defects in children weighing less than 10 kg.

Background:

Although percutaneous transcatheter device closure of ventricular septal defect is a well-established method of treatment in older children and adolescents, there is limited data on device closure in small children weighing less than 10 kg. We present our institutional experience of transcatheter VSD closure in children weighing less than 10 kg.

Method:

Medical records were reviewed for 16 children, who were selected for device closure of ventricular septal defects based on the inclusion criteria.

Results:

Out of 65 patients with a diagnosis of ventricular septal defect, 16 children less than 10 kg were attempted for percutaneous device closure. In 13 patients, the device was successfully released, and 3 patients needed surgical closure of the defect. Mean age and weight of the patients were 17.3 ± 12.7 months and 6.8 ± 3.2 kg, respectively. Mean defect size was 6 mm (range 3–10). There was no incidence of device embolisation or heart block or death. Five patients had residual left-to-right shunt immediately after the device release, which got closed by the first month’s follow-up. We had one accidental perforation of right ventricular free wall at the time of crossing of the defect, which was successfully repaired surgically.

Conclusion:

Percutaneous device closure of ventricular septal defect in small children with weight below 10 kg is feasible with good short-term outcome. Careful patient selection is essential for procedural success and to avoid complications.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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