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Red flags: a case series of clinician–family communication challenges in the context of CHD

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 January 2017

Priya Sekar*
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics. Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children’s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
Katie L. Marcus
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
Erin P. Williams
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
Renee D. Boss
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
*
Correspondence to: P. Sekar, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Charlotte R Bloomberg Children’s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, United States of America. Tel: 410 955 5987; Fax: 410 955 0897; E-mail: psekar1@jhmi.edu

Abstract

We describe three cases of newborns with complex CHD characterised by communication challenges. These communication challenges were categorised as patient, family, or system-related red flags. Strategies for addressing these red flags were proposed, for the goal of optimising care and improving quality of life in this vulnerable population.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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