Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-rvbq7 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-14T09:15:35.088Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2015

Kristin M. Burns*
Affiliation:
Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America
*
Correspondence to: K. M. Burns, MD, Medical Officer, Heart Development and Structural Diseases Branch, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 8220, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States of America. Tel: +301 594 6859; Fax: +301 480 2858; E-mail: Kristin.Burns@nih.gov

Abstract

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute’s support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*

Presented at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Heart Institute, International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit, Saint Petersburg, Florida, United States of America, 4–5 February, 2015.

References

1. Andrews, RE, Fenton, MJ, Ridout, DA, Burch, M. New-onset heart failure due to heart muscle disease in childhood: a prospective study in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Circulation 2008; 117: 7984.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Rossano, JW, Kim, JJ, Decker, JA, et al. Prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of heart failure-related hospitalizations in children in the United States: a population-based study. J Card Fail 2012; 18: 459470.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3. Hollander, SA, Bernstein, D, Yeh, J, Dao, D, Sun, HY, Rosenthal, D. Outcomes of children following a first hospitalization for dilated cardiomyopathy. Circ Heart Fail 2012; 5: 437443.Google Scholar
4. Rossano, JW, Kim, JJ, Decker, JA, et al. Increasing prevalence and hospital charges in pediatric heart failure related hospitalizations in the United States: a population-based study (abstract). Circulation 2010; 122: A13740.Google Scholar
5. Rossano, JW, Goldberg, DJ, Mott, AR, et al. Heart failure related hospitalizations in children with single ventricle heart disease in the united states: costly and getting more expensive. J Card Fail 2012; 18: S73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Research Portolio Online Reporting Tools. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. Retrieved January 26, 2015, from http://projectreporter.nih.gov/reporter.cfm Google Scholar
7. Grenier, MA, Osganian, SK, Cox, GF, et al. Design and implementation of the North American Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry. Am Heart J 2000; 139: S86S95.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8. Wilkinson, JD, Landy, DC, Colan, SD, et al. The pediatric cardiomyopathy registry and heart failure: key results from the first 15 years. Heart Fail Clin 2010; 6: 401413.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9. Baldwin, JT, Borovetz, HS, Duncan, BW, et al. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Pediatric Circulatory Support Program. Circulation 2006; 113: 147155.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10. Baldwin, JT, Borovetz, HS, Duncan, BW, Gartner, MJ, Jarvik, RK, Weiss, WJ. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Pediatric Circulatory Support Program: a summary of the 5-year experience. Circulation 2011; 123: 12331240.Google Scholar
11. Kirklin, JK, Naftel, DC, Pagani, FD, et al. Sixth InterMACS annual report: a 10,000-patient database. J Heart Lung Transplant 2014; 33: 555564.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12. Blume, E. The Pediatric Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (PediMACS), University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. Retrieved January 29, 2015, from http://www.uab.edu/medicine/intermacs/pedimacs Google Scholar
13. Hsu, DT, Zak, V, Mahony, L, et al. Enalapril in infants with single ventricle: results of a multicenter randomized trial. Circulation 2010; 122: 333340.Google Scholar
14. Diller, GP, Giardini, A, Dimopoulos, K, et al. Predictors of morbidity and mortality in contemporary Fontan patients: results from a multicenter study including cardiopulmonary exercise testing in 321 patients. Eur Heart J 2010; 31: 30733083.Google Scholar
15. Burns, KM, Byrne, BJ, Gelb, BD, et al. New mechanistic and therapeutic targets for pediatric heart failure: report from a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute working group. Circulation 2014; 130: 7986.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed