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Fetal CHD and perinatal outcomes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 April 2020

Christina J. Ge
Affiliation:
Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA
Amanda C. Mahle
Affiliation:
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
Irina Burd
Affiliation:
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
Eric B. Jelin
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
Priya Sekar
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
Angie C. Jelin*
Affiliation:
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Angie C. Jelin, MD, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Phipps 222, USA. Tel: +1 415 624 5206; Fax: +1 410 614 8305; E-mail: ajelin1@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate delivery management and outcomes in fetuses prenatally diagnosed with CHD.

Study design:

A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 6194 fetuses (born between 2013 and 2016), comparing prenatally diagnosed with CHD (170) to those with non-cardiac (234) and no anomalies (5790). Primary outcomes included the incidence of preterm delivery and mode of delivery.

Results:

Gestational age at delivery was significantly lower between the CHD and non-anomalous cohorts (38.6 and 39.1 weeks, respectively). Neonates with CHD had a significantly lower birth weights (p < 0.001). There was an approximately 1.5-fold increase in the rate of primary cesarean sections associated with prenatally diagnosed CHD with an odds ratio of 1.49 (95% CI 1.06–2.10).

Conclusions:

Our study provides additional evidence that the prenatal diagnosis of CHD is associated with a lower birth weight, preterm delivery, and with an increased risk of delivery by primary cesarean section.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

*

Co-last authorship

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