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Debunking, supervenience, and Hume’s Principle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2020

Mary Leng
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of York, York, UK
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Abstract

Debunking arguments against both moral and mathematical realism have been pressed, based on the claim that our moral and mathematical beliefs are insensitive to the moral/mathematical facts. In the mathematical case, I argue that the role of Hume’s Principle as a conceptual truth speaks against the debunkers’ claim that it is intelligible to imagine the facts about numbers being otherwise while our evolved responses remain the same. Analogously, I argue, the conceptual supervenience of the moral on the natural speaks presents a difficulty for the debunker’s claim that, had the moral facts been otherwise, our evolved moral beliefs would have remained the same.

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Copyright © Canadian Journal of Philosophy 2019

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