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How Canadian was eh? A baseline investigation of usage and ideology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Derek Denis
Affiliation:
University of Toronto Mississauga
Corresponding
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Abstract

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Type
Squib/Notule
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Linguistic Association/Association canadienne de linguistique 2020

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Footnotes

This squib grew out of joint work with Alexandra D'Arcy during my SSHRC postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Victoria (2015–2017) and greatly benefited from her feedback throughout. Thanks to her additionally for granting me access to the SCVE and DCVE. Thanks also to Sali Tagliamonte who granted me access to the TEA and Belleville Oral History Collection. Access to the Farm Work and Farm Life Since 1890 Oral History Collection was made available to me through a research agreement with the Archives of Ontario. Early results were presented at NWAV45 in Vancouver in 2016 and at a talk in Toronto in 2016. I thank the audiences for their feedback. I am also grateful to the CJL editor and two anonymous reviewers for their critiques, which much improved the argumentation and discussion herein.

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