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P162: Patient-important outcomes in hyperglycemia after discharge from the emergency department: a prospective cohort study

  • J. W. Yan (a1), L. Siddiqi (a1), K. Van Aarsen (a1), M. Columbus (a1) and K. M. Gushulak (a1)...

Abstract

Introduction: Hyperglycemic emergencies, including diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), carry significant morbidity for individuals even after discharge. The objective of this study was to describe the patient-important outcomes and burden of disease for emergency department (ED) patients with hyperglycemia after discharge from hospital. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of patients 18 years presenting to two tertiary care EDs (combined annual census 150,000 visits) with a discharge diagnosis of hyperglycemia, DKA or HHS over a 15-month period (Jul 2016-Oct 2017). During the ED visit, consent was obtained for a telephone follow-up call to determine patient-important outcomes. Trained research personnel collected data from medical records and completed a 14 day telephone follow-up using a standardized questionnaire to determine medication changes, missed days of school or work, and repeat admissions or visits to a healthcare provider. Descriptive statistics were used where appropriate to summarize the data. Results: Thus far, 172 patients have been enrolled in our study. Mean (SD) age is 53.9 (19.3) years and 97 (56.4%) are male. 65 (37.8%) patients were admitted from their initial ED visit. Of the 125 patients (72.7%) providing post-discharge outcomes, 75 (60.0%) required an adjustment to their diabetes medications or insulin. 21 (16.8%) patients missed days of school or work for a median (IQR) duration of 3.5 (1.3, 7.0) days. 85 (68.0%) saw another healthcare provider within a 14 day period, 45 (36.0%) saw their family physician, and 34 (27.2%) saw an internist or endocrinologist. 9 (7.2%) were seen again in the ED, 5 of these patients required admission to hospital. There was one death that occurred within the follow-up period. Conclusion: This prospective study builds on our previous retrospective work and demonstrates that visits for hyperglycemia carry a significant burden of disease beyond what may be seen in a single ED encounter. Further research will attempt to identify the factors that may be predictive of adverse outcomes in hyperglycemic patients presenting to the ED.

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