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P142: The anticoagulated trauma patient: a Canadian experience in the era of direct oral anticoagulants

  • B. Wood (a1), A. Ackery (a1), S. Rizoli (a1), B. Nascimento (a1), M. Sholzberg (a1), A. Mcfarlan (a1), M. McGowan (a1) and A. Phillips (a1)...

Abstract

Introduction: The anticoagulated trauma patient is a particularly vulnerable population. Our current practice is guided by experience with patients taking vitamin K dependent antagonists (VKA, like warfarin). It is currently unknown how the increasing use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will change our trauma population. We collected data about this new subset of patients to compare their clinical characteristics to patients on pre-injury VKA therapy. Methods: Retrospective review of anticoagulated trauma patients presenting to Toronto’s two adult trauma centres, Saint Michael’s Hospital and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, from June 2014-June 2015 was undertaken. Patients were recruited through the institutions’ trauma registries and were eligible if they suffered a traumatic injury and taking an oral anticoagulant pre-injury. Clinical and demographic data were extracted by a trained reviewer and analysed with descriptive statistics. Results: Our study recruited 85 patients, 33% were taking DOACs and 67% VKAs. Trauma patients on DOACs & VKAs respectively had similar baseline characteristics such as age (75.9 vs 77.4), initial injury severity score (ISS (16.9 vs 20.6)) and concomitant antiplatelet use (7.1% vs 5.4%). Both groups’ most common mechanism for injury was falls and the most common indication for anticoagulation was atrial fibrillation. Patients on DOACs tended to have lower average INR (1.25 vs 2.3) and serum creatinine (94.9 vs 127.4). Conclusion: Patients on DOACs pre-injury now account for a significant proportion of orally anticoagulated trauma patients. Patients on DOACs tended to have less derangement of basic hematological parameters complicating diagnosis and management of coagulopathy.

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P142: The anticoagulated trauma patient: a Canadian experience in the era of direct oral anticoagulants

  • B. Wood (a1), A. Ackery (a1), S. Rizoli (a1), B. Nascimento (a1), M. Sholzberg (a1), A. Mcfarlan (a1), M. McGowan (a1) and A. Phillips (a1)...

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