Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-frvt8 Total loading time: 0.374 Render date: 2022-09-26T19:03:43.896Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

MP46: Clinically significant traumatic intracranial haemorrhage following minor head trauma in older adults: a retrospective cohort study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2020

E. Mercier
Affiliation:
Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, QC
T. O'Brien
Affiliation:
Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, QC
B. Mitra
Affiliation:
Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, QC
N. Le Sage
Affiliation:
Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, QC
P. Tardif
Affiliation:
Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, QC
M. Emond
Affiliation:
Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, QC
M. D'Astous
Affiliation:
Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, QC

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Introduction: The primary objective of this study was to determine the incidence of clinically significant traumatic intracranial haemorrhage (T-ICH) following minor head trauma in older adults. Secondary objective was to investigate the impact of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies on T-ICH incidence. Methods: This retrospective cohort study extracted data from electronic patient records. The cohort consisted of patients presenting after a fall and/or head injury and presented to one of five ED between 1st March 2010 and 31st July 2017. Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 65 years old and a minor head trauma defined as an impact to the head without fulfilling criteria for traumatic brain injury. Results: From the 1,000 electronic medical records evaluated, 311 cases were included. The mean age was 80.1 (SD 7.9) years. One hundred and eighty-nine (189) patients (60.8%) were on an anticoagulant (n = 69), antiplatelet (n = 130) or both (n = 16). Twenty patients (6.4%) developed a clinically significant T-ICH. Anticoagulation and/or antiplatelets therapies were not associated with an increased risk of clinically significant T-ICH in this cohort (Odds ratio (OR) 2.7, 95% CI 0.9-8.3). Conclusion: In this cohort of older adults presenting to the ED following minor head trauma, the incidence of clinically significant T-ICH was 6.4%.

Type
Moderated Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2020
You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

MP46: Clinically significant traumatic intracranial haemorrhage following minor head trauma in older adults: a retrospective cohort study
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

MP46: Clinically significant traumatic intracranial haemorrhage following minor head trauma in older adults: a retrospective cohort study
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

MP46: Clinically significant traumatic intracranial haemorrhage following minor head trauma in older adults: a retrospective cohort study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *