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MP03: The epidemiology of mortality in patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS)

  • I. E. Blanchard (a1), D. Lane (a1), T. Williamson (a1), G. Vogelaar (a1), B. Hagel (a1), G. Lazarenko (a1), E. Lang (a1) and C. Doig (a1)...

Abstract

Introduction: Outside of key conditions such as cardiac arrest and trauma, little is known about the epidemiology of mortality of all transported EMS patients. The objective of this study is to describe characteristics of EMS patients who after transport die in a health care facility. Methods: EMS transport events over one year (April, 2015-16) from a BLS/ALS system serving an urban/rural population of approximately 2 million were linked with in-hospital datasets to determine proportion of all-cause in-hospital mortality by Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS) determinant (911 call triage system), age in years (>=18 yrs. - adult, <=17 yrs. - pediatric), sex, day of week, season, time (in six hour periods), and emergency department Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS). The MPDS card, patient chief complaint, and ED diagnosis category (International Classification of Disease v.10 - Canadian) with the highest proportion of mortality are also reported. Analyses included two-sided t-test or chi-square with alpha <0.05. Results: A total of 239,534 EMS events resulted in 159,507 patient transports; 141,114 were included for analysis after duplicate removal (89.1% linkage), with 127,867 reporting final healthcare system outcome. There were 4,269 who died (3.3%; 95%CI 3.2%, 3.4%). The proportion of mortality by MPDS determinant was, from most to least critical 911 call, Echo (7.3%), Delta (37.2%), Charlie (31.3%), Bravo (5.8%), Alpha (18.3%), and Omega (0.3%). For adults the mean age of survivors was less than non-survivors (57.7 vs. 75.8; p<0.001), but pediatric survivors were older than non-survivors (8.7 vs. 2.8; p<0.001). There were more males that died than females (53.0% vs. 47.0%; p<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the day of week (p=0.592), but there was by season with the highest mortality in winter (27.1%; p=0.045). The highest mortality occurred with patients presenting to EMS between 0600-1200 hours (34.6%), and the lowest between 0000-0600 hours (11.8%; p<0.001). Mortality by CTAS was category 1 (27.1%), 2 (36.7%), 3 (29.9%), 4 (4.3%), and 5 (0.5%). The highest mortality was seen in MPDS card 26-Sick Person (specific diagnosis) (19.1%), chief complaint shortness of breath (19.3%), and ED diagnoses pertaining to the circulatory system (31.1%). Conclusion: Significant all-cause in-hospital mortality differences were found between event, patient, and clinical characteristics. These data provide foundational and hypothesis generating knowledge regarding mortality in transported EMS patients that can be used to guide research and training. Future research should further explore the characteristics of those that access health care through the EMS system.

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MP03: The epidemiology of mortality in patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS)

  • I. E. Blanchard (a1), D. Lane (a1), T. Williamson (a1), G. Vogelaar (a1), B. Hagel (a1), G. Lazarenko (a1), E. Lang (a1) and C. Doig (a1)...

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