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Emergency physicians should not write orders for hospital admissions

  • Paul Pageau (a1), Robin Clouston (a2), Jo-Ann Talbot (a2) and Paul Atkinson (a2)
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Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Dr. Paul Atkinson, Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, Saint John Regional Hospital, 400 University Ave., Saint John, NB E2L 4L4; Email: paul.atkinson@dal.ca

References

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2.Responsibility for admitted patients, American College of Emergency Physicians Policy statement, 2014. Available at: https://www.acep.org/globalassets/new-pdfs/policy-statements/responsibility.for.admitted.patients.pdf
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22.Schull, MJ, Vermeulen, M, Slaughter, G, Morrison, L, Daly, P. Emergency department crowding and thrombolysis delays in acute myocardial infarction. Ann Emerg Med 2004;44(6):577–85.10.1016/j.annemergmed.2004.05.004
23.Diercks, DB, Roe, MT, Chen, AY, et al. Prolonged emergency department stays of non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients are associated with worse adherence to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for management and increased adverse events. Ann Emerg Med 2007;50(5):489–96.10.1016/j.annemergmed.2007.03.033
24.Fee, C, Weber, EJ, Maak, CA, Bacchetti, P. Effect of emergency department crowding on time to antibiotics in patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Ann Emerg Med 2007;50(5):501–9.10.1016/j.annemergmed.2007.08.003
25.Pines, JM, Localio, AR, Hollander, JE, et al. The impact of emergency department crowding measures on time to antibiotics for patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Ann Emerg Med 2007;50(5):510–6.10.1016/j.annemergmed.2007.07.021
26.Kennebeck, SS, Timm, NL, Kurowski, EM, Byczkowski, TL, Reeves, SD. The association of emergency department crowding and time to antibiotics in febrile neonates. Acad Emerg Med 2011;18(12):1380–5.10.1111/j.1553-2712.2011.01221.x
27.Pines, JM, Hollander, JE. Emergency department crowding is associated with poor care for patients with severe pain. Ann Emerg Med 2008;51(1):15.10.1016/j.annemergmed.2007.07.008
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30.Ulmer, C, Miller Wolman, D, Johns, MM, et al. Resident Duty Hours: Enhancing Sleep, Supervision, and Safety. Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Optimizing Graduate Medical Trainee (Resident) Hours and Work Schedule to Improve Patient Safety. Washington (DC). US: National Academies Press; 2009.
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37.Apker, J, Mallak, LA, Applegate, EB 3rd, Gibson, SC, Ham, JJ, Johnson, NA, et al. Exploring emergency physician-hospitalist handoff interactions: development of the Handoff Communication Assessment. Ann Emerg Med 2010;55(2):161–70.10.1016/j.annemergmed.2009.09.021
38.Sentinel Event Alert 58: Hand off Communications. Joint Commission Center for Transforming Health Care. Sep 12, 2017. Available at: www.jointcommision.org (accessed September 24, 2018).

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Emergency physicians should not write orders for hospital admissions

  • Paul Pageau (a1), Robin Clouston (a2), Jo-Ann Talbot (a2) and Paul Atkinson (a2)

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