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REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY AND LABORATORY REARING OF CERANTHIA SAMARENSIS (VILLENEUVE) (DIPTERA: TACHINIDAE), A PARASITOID OF THE GYPSY MOTH, LYMANTRIA DISPAR (L.)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

F.W. Quednau
Affiliation:
Forestry Canada, Quebec Region, 1055 du P.E.P.S., PO Box 3800, Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada G1V 4C7

Abstract

Laboratory observations on the biology of Ceranthia samarensis (Villeneuve), a tachinid parasitoid of the gypsy moth, were carried out in the laboratory at 22 °C day/15 °C night, 85–90% RH, and a 12L:12D photoperiod. Older (5–6 days post-eclosion) males mated readily with newly emerged females. Mating success was 60%. The gestation period of the mated females was 10–12 days. Laboratory-reared (on diet) second- and third-instar gypsy moth larvae feeding on newly grown foliage of Quercus rubra L. were exposed to gravid females of the parasitoid. Ceranthia samarensis ovolarviposited on the body of the host. The first-instar larva penetrated the host cuticle and developed internally, forming a respiratory funnel that caused a dark circular scar on the lateral side of the caterpillar. The average number of progeny (puparia) produced over the lifetime of a C. samarensis female was 55.0 ± 5.0 (SE) and average longevity was 4.1 ± 1.7 (SE) days. Diapause of the puparia was facultative and induced by temperatures below 20 °C combined with a 12L:12D photoperiod. In nondiapause individuals, total generation time was 22–40 days. To obtain diapause insects, puparia were stored for2monthsat 15 °C, 100% RH, and 12L:12D photoperiod for development of pharate adults. Cold storage at 2–4 °C and 100% RH for at least 5 months was required to obtain up to 75% eclosion after 5–9 days the following year.

Résumé

Des observations sur la biologie de Ceranthia samarensis (Villeneuve), un parasitoïde tachinide de la spongieuse, furent réalisées au laboratoire à une température de 22 °C le jour et de 15 °C la nuit, 85–90% HR et 12L : 12N photopériode. Des mâles âgés de 5–6 jours après l’éclosion s’accouplaient mieux avec des femelles récemment écloses que des mâles plus jeunes. Le taux de réussite des accouplements était de 60%. La période de gestation de la femelle accouplée était de 10–12 jours. Des larves des deuxième et troisième stades de la spongieuse, élevées au laboratoire sur diète, ont été exposées sur feuillage tendre de Quercus rubra L. Les femelles de C. samarensis sont ovolarvipares; les oeufs éclosent dès qu’ils sont déposés sur le corps d’une chenille. L’asticot du premier stade pénètre le tégument de son hôte et, après une courte période libre dans l’hémocèle, le parasitoïde forme un tube respiratoire qui peut laisser une tache noire circulaire sur le côté de la chenille. Le nombre moyen de progénitures (pupes) obtenu par femelle était de 55,0 ± 5,0 (SE), et la longévité moyenne de 44,1 ± 1,7 (SE) jours. La diapause pupale facultative est provoquée par des températures au-dessous de 20 °C, sous une photopériode de 12L : 12N. Sans diapause, le cycle de vie du parasitoïde était de 22–40 jours. Pour obtenir des insectes en diapause, les pupes ont été exposées pendant 2 mois à 15 °C et 100% HR sous une photopériode de 12L : 12N. Pour l’hivernement, un séjour à 2–4 °C et 100% HR d’au moins 5 mois était requis pour obtenir jusqu’à 75% d’éclosions après 5–9 jours l’année suivante.

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Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1993

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References

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REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY AND LABORATORY REARING OF CERANTHIA SAMARENSIS (VILLENEUVE) (DIPTERA: TACHINIDAE), A PARASITOID OF THE GYPSY MOTH, LYMANTRIA DISPAR (L.)
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REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY AND LABORATORY REARING OF CERANTHIA SAMARENSIS (VILLENEUVE) (DIPTERA: TACHINIDAE), A PARASITOID OF THE GYPSY MOTH, LYMANTRIA DISPAR (L.)
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REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY AND LABORATORY REARING OF CERANTHIA SAMARENSIS (VILLENEUVE) (DIPTERA: TACHINIDAE), A PARASITOID OF THE GYPSY MOTH, LYMANTRIA DISPAR (L.)
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