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POSTDIAPAUSE DEVELOPMENT AND ADULT EMERGENCE OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS WALKER (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE) DURING ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE INCUBATION

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

G.H. Whitfield
Affiliation:
Agriculture Canada Research Station, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1
K.W. Richards
Affiliation:
Agriculture Canada Research Station, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1

Extract

Pteromalus venustus Walker is the most common parasitoid associated with the alfalfa leafcutter bee, Megachile rotundata (F.), in western Canada (Richards 1984). Leafcutter beekeepers in Canada and the United States use several methods to control P. venustus during incubation of leafcutter bee larvae, including light traps (Hobbs 1973; Richards 1984), dipping the cells in an insecticide (Brindley 1976; Parker 1979), and placing dichlorvos resin strips in the incubator (Hill et al. 1984). Previously we described the influence of temperature on survival and rate of development of the egg, larval, and pupal stages of non-diapausing P. venustus (Whitfield and Richards 1985). Here we report on the influence of temperature on rate of postdiapause development in P. venustus during leafcutter bee incubation and consider the value of this information for timing control measures for this parasitoid.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1987

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References

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POSTDIAPAUSE DEVELOPMENT AND ADULT EMERGENCE OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS WALKER (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE) DURING ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE INCUBATION
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POSTDIAPAUSE DEVELOPMENT AND ADULT EMERGENCE OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS WALKER (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE) DURING ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE INCUBATION
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POSTDIAPAUSE DEVELOPMENT AND ADULT EMERGENCE OF PTEROMALUS VENUSTUS WALKER (HYMENOPTERA: PTEROMALIDAE) DURING ALFALFA LEAFCUTTER BEE INCUBATION
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