Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-28jzs Total loading time: 29.672 Render date: 2021-03-06T01:38:15.462Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Host species influences body size and egg load of the bark beetle parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2012

Sherah L. VanLaerhoven
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Arkansas, 319 Agriculture Building, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, United States of America
Fred M. Stephen
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Arkansas, 319 Agriculture Building, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, United States of America
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

As early as 1844, it was stated that the size of the host may influence the size of parasitoid adults (Ratzeburg 1844) and that parasitoid size may affect fecundity (Salt 1941). Although positive relationships between host and parasitoid body size have been supported in the literature (Tillman and Cate 1993; Heimpel and Rosenheim 1995), this relationship is not universal to all host–parasitoid systems (King 1991; Morse 1994). Although the relationship between host size and body size of parasitoid adults has been observed for some bark beetle parasitoids (Bushing 1967; Samson 1984), the relationship between body size and fecundity has not been studied for bark beetle parasitoids. Roptrocerus xylophagorum Ratzeburg (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is a bark beetle parasitoid with a wide host range that includes beetles in the genera Dendroctonus, Ips, and Scolytus (Bushing 1967).

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bushing, R.W. 1967. Parasites of the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis Le Conte (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), with particular reference to Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Ratzeburg) (Hymenoptera: Torymidae). PhD dissertation, University of California, BerkeleyGoogle Scholar
Goyer, R.A., Lenhard, G.J., Nebeker, T.E., Jarrard, L.D. 1981. How to identify common insect associates of the southern pine beetle. United States Department of Agriculture Agriculture Handbook 563Google Scholar
Heimpel, G.E., Rosenheim, J.A. 1995. Dynamic host feeding by the parasitoid Aphytis melinus: the balance between current and future reproduction. Journal of Animal Ecology 64: 153–67CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, B.H. 1991. A field study of host size effects on sex ratio of the parasitoid wasp Spalangia cameroni. American Midland Naturalist 125: 10–7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, P.E., Richards, J.G. 1969. Oogenesis in Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). Proceedings of the Royal Entomological Society of London Series A General Entomology 44: 143–57CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mendel, Z. 1986. Hymenopterous parasitoids of bark beetles (Scolytidae) in Israel: relationships between host and parasitoid size, and sex ratio. Entomophaga 31: 127–37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morse, D.H. 1994. The effect of host size on sex ratio in the ichneumonid wasp, Trychosis cyperia, a spider parasitoid. American Midland Naturalist 131: 281–7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paine, T.D., Birch, M.C., Svihra, P. 1981. Niche breadth and resource partitioning by four sympatric species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). Oecologia 48: 16CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ratzeburg, J.T.C. 1844. Die Ichneumonen der Forstinsekten in forstlicher und entomologischer Beziehung. Berlin: JTC Ratzeburg.Google Scholar
Salt, G. 1941. The effects of hosts upon their insect parasites. Biological Reviews (Cambridge) 16: 239–64CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Samson, P.R. 1984. The biology of Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hym.: Torymidae), with a note on its taxonomic status. Entomophaga 29: 287–98CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SAS Institute Inc. 1997. JMP IN. Version 3.2.1. Cary, North Carolina: SAS Institute IncGoogle Scholar
Tillman, P.G., Cate, J.R. 1993. Effect of host size on adult size and sex ratio of Bracon mellitor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Environmental Entomology 22: 1161–5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
VanLaerhoven, S.L., Hanano, T.L., Stephen, F.M. 2002. Baseline egg load of the southern pine beetle parasitoid complex. The Canadian Entomologist 134: 551–60CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, D.L. 1982. The role of pheromones, kairomones, and allomones in the host selection and colonization behavior of bark beetles. Annual Review of Entomology 27: 411–46CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 16 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 6th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Host species influences body size and egg load of the bark beetle parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Host species influences body size and egg load of the bark beetle parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Host species influences body size and egg load of the bark beetle parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *