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Mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence among Schizaphis graminum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) clones from cultivated and non-cultivated hosts: haplotype and host associations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

J.A. Anstead
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, 127 Noble Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
J.D. Burd
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, Plant Science and Water Conservation Research Laboratory, 1301 N. Western Road, Stillwater, OK 74075, USA
K.A. Shufran
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, Plant Science and Water Conservation Research Laboratory, 1301 N. Western Road, Stillwater, OK 74075, USA
Corresponding

Abstract

A 1.0 kb region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene from the greenbug aphid, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), was sequenced for 24 field collected clones from non-cultivated and cultivated hosts. Maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and neighbour-joining phylogenies were estimated for these clones, plus 12 previously sequenced clones. All three tests produced trees with identical topologies and confirmed the presence of three clades within S. graminum. Clones showed no relationship between biotype and mtDNA haplotype. At least one biotype was found in all three clades, suggesting exchange among clades of genetic material conditioning for crop virulence, or the sharing of a common ancestor. However, there was a relationship between host and haplotype. Clade 1 was the most homogenous and contained 12 of 16 clones collected from cultivated hosts and five of the six collected from johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense, a congener of cultivated sorghum, S. bicolor. Four of the six clones collected from Agropyron spp. were found in clade 2. Clade 3 contained two clones from wheat, Triticum aestivum, and four from non-cultivated hosts other than Agropyron spp. A partitioning of populations by mtDNA haplotype and host suggests the occurrence of host adapted races in Schizaphis graminum.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2002

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Mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence among Schizaphis graminum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) clones from cultivated and non-cultivated hosts: haplotype and host associations
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