Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Factors affecting abundance and oviposition rates of a field population of the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

R.J. Mahon
Affiliation:
CSIRO Entomology, GPO Box 1700Canberra ACT 2601Australia
H. Ahmad
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Services, Institut Haiwan, PO Box 450 Kluang, Johor 86009, Malaysia
K.G. Wardhaugh
Affiliation:
CSIRO Entomology, GPO Box 1700Canberra ACT 2601Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Sentinel cattle and a grid of swormlure-baited sticky traps were used to monitor a Malaysian population of the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana Villeneuve. Observations were carried out on an isolated cattle station at monthly intervals during the period August 1996 to June 2000. The number of flies caught was unaffected by weather conditions at the time of trapping, but was positively correlated with the total rainfall and the average daily air temperature prevailing 15–28 days earlier, when trapped flies were still juveniles. Trap catches were biased in favour of females, but daily catch rates of both sexes increased significantly the longer traps were open, suggesting that efficacy was related to the differential volatility of the chemicals comprising swormlure. Oviposition on sentinel cattle occurred mostly in late afternoon or early evening but increased significantly as the wound aged. Oviposition rates were positively correlated with female catch rates, but the relationship was curvilinear, suggesting that fly populations may be subject to some form of density-dependent constraint. Consistent differences in oviposition rates on sentinel cattle at different localities on the cattle station suggested the existence of highly clumped, quasi-stationary populations. Differences in trap catches between traps located in pastoral areas and those sited in nearby oil palm or rubber plantations supported this interpretation of the data. These findings are discussed in relation to the use of the sterile insect technique for the control of screw-worm fly infestations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Al-Izzi, M.A.J. (2002) Work by the Arab Organization for Agriculture Development to control the Old World screw-worm fly. Proceedings of the Screw-worm fly Emergency Preparedness Conference, Canberra November 2001 187–193 Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry AustraliaGoogle Scholar
Anon. (1990) A national review of Australia's longer term screw-worm fly (Swf) preparedness strategy 30 pp. Canberra Department of Primary Industries and EnergyGoogle Scholar
ARMCANZ (Agriculture and Resource Management Council of Australia and New Zealand). (1996) Disease strategy: screw-worm fly 1996, edition 2.0, 36 pp. in Australian Veterinary Emergency Plan AUZVETPLAN. CanberraARMCANZ.Google Scholar
Brown, H.E. & Mackley, J.W. (1983) Changes in the attractancy and chemical composition of the screwworm (Diptera: Calliphoridae) chemical attractant, Swormlure-2, under field conditions. Journal of Economic Entomology 76, 12731278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crawley, M.J. (1993) GLIM for ecologists. Oxford, Blackwell Scientific PublicationsGoogle Scholar
Cuthbertson, A. (1933) The habits and life histories of some Diptera in Southern Rhodesia. Proceedings of the Rhodesia Scientific Association 32, 81112.Google Scholar
Foster, G.G., Kitching, R.L., Vogt, W.G. & Whitten, M.J. (1975) Sheep blowfly and its control in the pastoral ecosystem of Australia. Proceedings of the Ecological Society of Australia 9, 213219.Google Scholar
Gilmour, D., Waterhouse, D.F., McIntyre, G.A. (1946) An account of experiments undertaken to determine the natural population density of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina Wied. Bulletin of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Melbourne No. 195Google Scholar
Glanville, R. (2001) Screw-worm fly–the risk of incursion and economic studies in Australia. pp. 74–84 Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry Australia.Google Scholar
Hammack, L., Bromel, M., Duh, F.M. & Gassner, G. (1987) Reproductive factors affecting responses of the screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae), to an attractant of bacterial origin. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 80, 775780.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Krafsur, E.S., Hightower, B.G. & Leira, L. (1979) A longitudinal study of screwworm populations, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae), in northern Veracruz, Mexico. Journal of Medical Entomology 16, 470481.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Krafsur, E.S., Whitten, C.J. & Novy, J.E. (1987) Screwworm eradication in North and Central America. Parasitology Today 3, 131137.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, J. (2002) Hunting screw-worm fly. pp. 8589 in Proceedings of the Screw-worm Fly Emergency Preparedness ConferenceCanberraNovember 2001Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry Australia.Google Scholar
Mackley, J.W. & Brown, H.E. (1984) Swormlure-4: a new formulation of the Swormlure-2 mixture as an attractant for adult screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Journal of Economic Entomology 77, 12641268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norris, K.R. & Murray, M.D. (1964) Notes on the screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as a pest of cattle in New Guinea. CSIRO Division of Entomology Technical paper, Number 6 126.Google Scholar
OCVO (2002) Proceedings of the Screw-worm fly emergency preparedness conference, Canberra 12–15 November 2001 264 pp. Canberra, Office of the Chief Veterinary Officer, Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry AustraliaGoogle Scholar
Patton, W.S. (1920) Some notes on Indian Calliphoridae. Part 1. Chrysomyia bezziana Villeneuve, the common Indian calliphorine whose larvae cause cutaneous myiasis in man and animals. Indian Journal of Medical Research 8, 1729.Google Scholar
Perkins, I.D. (1987) Use of insecticides to control screw-worm fly strike by Chrysomya bezziana in cattle. Australian Veterinary Journal 64, 1720.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spradbery, J.P. (1979) The reproductive status of Chrysomya species (Diptera: Calliphoridae) attracted to liver-baited blowfly traps in Papua New Guinea. Journal of the Australian Entomological Society 18, 5761.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spradbery, J.P. (1981) A new trap design for screw-worm fly studies. Journal of the Australian Entomological Society 20, 151153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spradbery, J.P. (1991) A manual for the diagnosis of screw-worm fly. Department of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra.Google Scholar
Spradbery, J.P. (1994) Screw-worm fly: a tale of two species. Agricultural Zoology Reviews 6, 162.Google Scholar
Spradbery, J.P. (2002) The screw-worm fly problem: a background briefing. Proceedings of the Screw-worm Fly Emergency Preparedness Conference,Canberra,November 2001Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry Australia.Google Scholar
Spradbery, J.P. & Schweizer, G. (1979) Ingestion of food by the adult screw-worm fly Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera, Calliphoridae). Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 25, 7585.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spradbery, J.P. & Vogt, W.G. (1993) Mean life expectancy of Old World screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana, inferred from the reproductive age-structure of native females caught on swormlure-baited sticky traps. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 7, 147155.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spradbery, J.P., Tozer, R.S., Drewett, N. & Linsey, M.J. (1985) The efficacy of ivermectin against larvae of the screw-worm fly (Chrysomya bezziana). Australian Veterinary Journal 9, 311314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spradbery, J.P., Tozer, R.S., Robb, J.M. & Cassells, P. (1989) The screw-worm fly Chrysomya bezziana Villeneuve (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a sterile insect release trial in Papua New Guinea. Researches on Population Ecology 31, 353366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spradbery, J.P., Mahon, R.J., Morton, R. & Tozer, R.S. (1995) Dispersal of the Old World screw-worm fly Chrysomya bezziana. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 9, 161168.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stoffalano, J.G., Bartley, M.M. & Chin-Min, Y. (1990) Male and female Phormia regina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) trapped at two different baits in the field. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 83, 603606.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sutherst, R.W., Spradbery, J.P. & Maywald, G.F. (1989) The potential geographical distribution of the Old World screw-worm fly Chrysomya bezziana. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 3, 273280.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Taylor, L.R. (1961) Aggregation, variance and the mean. Nature, 732735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tweddle, N. & Mahon, R.J. (2000) Insurance against an Old World screw-worm fly invasion of Australia. (Ed.) Area-wide control of fruit flies and other pests 95–99 in Tan, K.H. Penerbit Universiti Sains MalaysiaGoogle Scholar
Vogt, W.G. (1986) Influences of weather and time of day on trap catches of bush fly, Musca vetustissima Walker (Diptera: Muscidae). Bulletin of Entomological Research 76, 359366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vogt, W.G. (1988) Influence of weather on trap catches of Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Journal of the Australian Entomological Society 27, 99103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vogt, W.G. & Havenstein, D.E. (1974) A standardised bait trap for blowfly studies. Journal of the Australian Entomological Society 13, 249253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vogt, W.G. & Woodburn,, T.L. (1994) Effects of bait age on the number, sex and age composition of Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in Western Australian blowfly traps. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 34, 595600.Google Scholar
Vogt,, W.G., Woodburn, T.L. & Crompton, G.W. (1981) Estimating absolute densities of the bushfly, Musca vetustissima (Diptera: Muscidae) using West Australian blowfly traps. Bulletin of Entomological Research 71, 329337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vogt, W.G., Runko, S. & Starick, N.T. (1985) A wind-oriented fly trap for quantitative sampling of adult Musca vetustissima. Journal of the Australian Entomological Society 24, 223227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vogt, W.G., van Gerwen, A.C.M. & Walker, J. (2001) Estimating population densities of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) from catches in wind-oriented traps. FLICS flystrike and lice IPM control strategies pp 302308Champion, S. (eds) Launceston, University of Tasmania.Google Scholar
Vogt, W.G., Woodburn, T.L., Morton, R. & Ellem, B.A. (1983) The analysis and standardisation of trap catches of Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Bulletin of Entomological Research 73, 315319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wall, R., French, N.P. & Morgan, K.L. (1992) Effects of temperature on the development and abundance of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Bulletin of Entomological Research 82, 125131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wall, R., French, N.P. & Morgan, K.L. (1993) Predicting the abundance of the blowfly, Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Bulletin of Entomological Research 83, 431436.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wardhaugh, K.G. (2001) The biology and ecology of the Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann)–an update. pp. 5361Launceston, University of Tasmania.Google Scholar
Wardhaugh, K.G., Read, P., & Neave, M., (1984) A sticky-trap for studying the spatial distribution of the Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina. Australian Veterinary Journal 61, 132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wardhaugh, K.G., Bedo, D. & Vogt, W.G. (1994) Management model for the control of flystrike in sheep. pp. 7074 in Into the Future. Proceedings of the Australian Veterinary Association Conference,Canberra,March 1994.Google Scholar
Wardhaugh, K.G., Mahon, R.J. & Ahmad, H. (2001) Efficacy of macrocyclic lactones for the control of larvae of the Old World screw-worm fly (Chrysomya bezziana). Australian Veterinary Journal 79, 120124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 43 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 15th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-mhpm4 Total loading time: 0.488 Render date: 2021-01-15T20:41:42.872Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Fri Jan 15 2021 20:00:43 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Factors affecting abundance and oviposition rates of a field population of the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Factors affecting abundance and oviposition rates of a field population of the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Factors affecting abundance and oviposition rates of a field population of the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *