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Co-existence of different host-adapted forms of the Myzus persicae group (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in southern Italy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

J.T. Margaritopoulos*
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Entomology and Agricultural Zoology, Department of Crop Production and Agricultural Environment, University of Thessaly, Fytokoustr., 38446 Nea Ionia, Magnesia, Greece
R.L. Blackman
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK
J.A. Tsitsipis
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Entomology and Agricultural Zoology, Department of Crop Production and Agricultural Environment, University of Thessaly, Fytokoustr., 38446 Nea Ionia, Magnesia, Greece
L. Sannino
Affiliation:
Istituto Sperimentale per il Tabacco, Via Vitiello 66, I-84018 Scafati, Italy
*
* Fax: +30 421 0 93286 E-mail: jmarg@uth.gr

Abstract

Multivariate morphometric analysis (method of canonical variates) was used to compare 38 parthenogenetic lineages and three field collections of aphids of the Myzus persicae (Sulzer) group sampled on peach and tobacco in the Caserta region of southern Italy. Comparisons were also made with the morphology of lineages collected on peach in Lehonia, in central eastern Greece away from tobacco-growing regions, and on tobacco in Naphplion, in southern Greece. The lineages were measured after parthenogenetic rearing for one to three generations on the same host (potato) under constant conditions. As in previous work, the multivariate morphometric approach separated the aphids from peach from those feeding on tobacco. The life cycle category of the lineages was also examined. Almost all the lineages from peach in Caserta were holocyclic, yet the lineages from tobacco in the same region were unable to produce sexual morphs. The results suggest that tobacco-adapted and non-tobacco-adapted forms co-exist in the same region in southern Italy, not only because they colonize different host plants, but also because they have different life cycles. This is in complete contrast to the situation in peach-growing areas of northern Greece, and shows that the ecology and population structure of M. persicae is different in neighbouring counties of the Mediterranean area, even where climatic conditions and cultivated crops are similar.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2003

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