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Campaign Events, the Media and the Prospects of Victory: The 1992 and 1996 US Presidential Elections

  • DARON R. SHAW (a1) and BRIAN E. ROBERTS (a1)

Abstract

Presidential campaigns are the most obvious means by which American voters receive information about candidates and issues, yet there is strong resistance to the notion that they influence presidential elections. We conduct an examination of presidential campaign effects in the 1992 and 1996 elections that features three departures from previous studies: (1) a stronger definition of campaigning and campaign events, facilitating a clearer idea of what it is that we are testing; (2) detailed data on television and newspaper coverage of the campaigns, allowing us to measure media effects; and (3) an alternative measure of electoral impact that is resistant to survey errors and random movement. We find that campaign events, and particularly media coverage of those events, significantly affect the candidates' chances for electoral success.

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Campaign Events, the Media and the Prospects of Victory: The 1992 and 1996 US Presidential Elections

  • DARON R. SHAW (a1) and BRIAN E. ROBERTS (a1)

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