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The protective effect of a mix of Lactarius deterrimus and Castanea sativa extracts on streptozotocin-induced oxidative stress and pancreatic β-cell death

  • Nevena Grdović (a1), Svetlana Dinić (a1), Jelena Arambašić (a1), Mirjana Mihailović (a1), Aleksandra Uskoković (a1), Jelena Marković (a1), Goran Poznanović (a1), Senka Vidović (a2), Zoran Zeković (a2), Aida Mujić (a3), Ibrahim Mujić (a4) and Melita Vidaković (a1)...

Abstract

Pancreatic β-cell death or dysfunction mediated by oxidative stress underlies the development and progression of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we tested extracts from the edible mushroom Lactarius deterrimus and the chestnut Castanea sativa, as well as their mixture (MIX Ld/Cs), for potential beneficial effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced pancreatic β-cell death. Analysis of chelating effects, reducing power and radical-scavenging assays revealed strong antioxidant effects of the C. sativa extract and MIX Ld/Cs, while the L. deterrimus extract displayed a weak to moderate effect. The antioxidative effect of the chestnut extract corresponds with the high content of phenolics and flavonoids identified by HPLC analysis. In contrast, the mushroom extract contains relatively small amounts of phenols and flavonoids. However, both extracts, and especially their combination MIX Ld/Cs, increased cell viability after the STZ treatment as a result of a significant reduction of DNA damage and improved redox status. The chestnut extract and MIX Ld/Cs significantly lowered the STZ-induced increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, while the mushroom extract had no impact on the activities of these antioxidant enzymes. However, the L. deterrimus extract exhibited good NO-scavenging activity. Different mechanisms that underlie antioxidant effects of the mushroom and chestnut extracts were discussed. When combined as in the MIX Ld/Cs, the extracts exhibited diverse but synergistic actions that ultimately exerted beneficial and protective effects against STZ-induced pancreatic β-cell death.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr M. Vidaković, fax +381 11 2761433, email melita@ibiss.bg.ac.rs

References

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The protective effect of a mix of Lactarius deterrimus and Castanea sativa extracts on streptozotocin-induced oxidative stress and pancreatic β-cell death

  • Nevena Grdović (a1), Svetlana Dinić (a1), Jelena Arambašić (a1), Mirjana Mihailović (a1), Aleksandra Uskoković (a1), Jelena Marković (a1), Goran Poznanović (a1), Senka Vidović (a2), Zoran Zeković (a2), Aida Mujić (a3), Ibrahim Mujić (a4) and Melita Vidaković (a1)...

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