Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Nut consumption is associated with better nutrient intakes: results from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey

  • Rachel C. Brown (a1), Siew Ling Tey (a2), Andrew R. Gray (a3), Alex Chisholm (a1), Claire Smith (a1), Elizabeth Fleming (a1) and Winsome Parnell (a1)...

Abstract

A limited number of studies have examined associations between nut consumption and nutrient intakes or diet quality. None has investigated these associations in the Southern Hemisphere. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between nut consumption and nutrient intakes among adult New Zealanders. Data from the 24-h recalls of 4721 participants from the cross-sectional 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey (2008/09 NZANS) were used to determine whole nut intake and total nut intake from all sources as well as nutrient intakes. Regression models, both unadjusted and adjusted for potential confounders, were used to estimate differences in nutrient intakes between those consuming and those not consuming nuts. From adjusted models, compared with non-whole nut consumers, whole nut consumers had higher intakes of energy and percentage of energy from total fat, MUFA and PUFA, whereas percentage of energy from SFA and carbohydrate was lower (all P≤0·025). After the additional adjustment for energy intake, whole nut consumers had higher intakes of dietary fibre, vitamin E, folate, Cu, Mg, K, P and Zn (all P≤0·044), whereas cholesterol and vitamin B12 intakes were significantly lower (both P≤0·013). Total nut consumption was associated with similar nutrient profiles as observed in whole nut consumers, albeit less pronounced. Nut consumption was associated with better nutrient profiles, especially a lower intake of SFA and higher intakes of unsaturated fats and a number of vitamins and minerals that could collectively reduce the risk for chronic disease, in particular for CVD.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Nut consumption is associated with better nutrient intakes: results from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Nut consumption is associated with better nutrient intakes: results from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Nut consumption is associated with better nutrient intakes: results from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: R. C. Brown, fax +64 3 479 7958, email rachel.brown@otago.ac.nz

References

Hide All
1. Kris-Etherton, PM, Yu-Poth, S, Sabate, J, et al. (1999) Nuts and their bioactive constituents: effects on serum lipids and other factors that affect disease risk. Am J Clin Nutr 70, 504S511S.
2. Nash, SD & Nash, DT (2008) Nuts as part of a healthy cardiovascular diet. Curr Atheroscler Rep 10, 529535.
3. Ros, E (2010) Health benefits of nut consumption. Nutrients 2, 652682.
4. Alasalvar, C & Bolling, BW (2015) Review of nut phytochemicals, fat-soluble bioactives, antioxidant components and health effects. Br J Nutr 113, S68S78.
5. Brufau, G, Boatella, J & Rafecas, M (2006) Nuts: source of energy and macronutrients. Br J Nutr 96, S24S28.
6. Bolling, BW, Chen, CY, McKay, DL, et al. (2011) Tree nut phytochemicals: composition, antioxidant capacity, bioactivity, impact factors. A systematic review of almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts. Nutr Res Rev 24, 244275.
7. O’Neil, CE, Keast, DR, Fulgoni, VL, et al. (2010) Tree nut consumption improves nutrient intake and diet quality in US adults: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 19, 142150.
8. O’Neil, CE, Nicklas, TA & Fulgoni, VL 3rd (2015) Tree nut consumption is associated with better nutrient adequacy and diet quality in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2010. Nutrients 7, 595607.
9. O’Neil, CE, Keast, DR, Nicklas, TA, et al. (2012) Out-of-hand nut consumption is associated with improved nutrient intake and health risk markers in US children and adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004. Nutr Res 32, 185194.
10. King, JC, Blumberg, J, Ingwersen, L, et al. (2008) Tree nuts and peanuts as components of a healthy diet. J Nutr 138, 1736S1740S.
11. Griel, AE, Eissenstat, B, Juturu, V, et al. (2004) Improved diet quality with peanut consumption. J Am Coll Nutr 23, 660668.
12. Jaceldo-Siegl, K, Joan, S, Rajaram, S, et al. (2004) Long-term almond supplementation without advice on food replacement induces favourable nutrient modifications to the habitual diets of free-living individuals. Br J Nutr 92, 533540.
13. Tey, SL, Brown, R, Gray, A, et al. (2011) Nuts improve diet quality compared to other energy-dense snacks while maintaining body weight. J Nutr Metab 2011, 357350.
14. Smith, C, Gray, AR, Mainvil, LA, et al. (2015) Secular changes in intakes of foods among New Zealand adults from 1997 to 2008/09. Public Health Nutr, 111.
15. Willett, WC, Sacks, F, Trichopoulou, A, et al. (1995) Mediterranean diet pyramid: a cultural model for healthy eating. Am J Clin Nutr 61, 1402S1406S.
16. Smith, C, Gray, AR, Fleming, EA, et al. (2014) Characteristics of fast-food/takeaway-food and restaurant/cafe-food consumers among New Zealand adults. Public Health Nutr 17, 23682377.
17. Crider, KS, Bailey, LB & Berry, RJ (2011) Folic acid food fortification – its history, effect, concerns, and future directions. Nutrients 3, 370384.
18. Nowson, CA, McGrath, JJ, Ebeling, PR, et al. (2012) Vitamin D and health in adults in Australia and New Zealand: a position statement. Med J Aust 196, 686687.
19. Thomson, CD (2004) Selenium and iodine intakes and status in New Zealand and Australia. Br J Nutr 91, 661672.
20. University of Otago and Ministry of Health (2011) Methodology Report for the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey. Wellington: Ministry of Health.
21. Cole, TJ, Bellizzi, MC, Flegal, KM, et al. (2000) Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: international survey. BMJ 320, 12401243.
22. Cole, TJ, Flegal, KM, Nicholls, D, et al. (2007) Body mass index cut offs to define thinness in children and adolescents: international survey. BMJ 335, 194197.
23. Brown, RC, Tey, SL, Gray, AR, et al. (2014) Patterns and predictors of nut consumption: results from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey. Br J Nutr 112, 20282040.
24. Bao, Y, Han, J, Hu, FB, et al. (2013) Association of nut consumption with total and cause-specific mortality. N Engl J Med 369, 20012011.
25. Hshieh, TT, Petrone, AB, Gaziano, JM, et al. (2015) Nut consumption and risk of mortality in the Physicians’ Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr 101, 407412.
26. Luo, C, Zhang, Y, Ding, YS, et al. (2014) Nut consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr 100, 256269.
27. Zhou, DH, Yu, HB, He, F, et al. (2014) Nut consumption in relation to cardiovascular disease risk and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Am J Clin Nutr 100, 270277.
28. Blanco Mejia, S, Kendall, CW, Viguiliouk, E, et al. (2014) Effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome criteria: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. BMJ Open 4, e004660.
29. Sabate, J, Oda, K & Ros, E (2010) Nut consumption and blood lipid levels: a pooled analysis of 25 intervention trials. Arch Intern Med 170, 821827.
30. Viguiliouk, E, Kendall, CW, Blanco Mejia, S, et al. (2014) Effect of tree nuts on glycemic control in diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled dietary trials. PLOS ONE 9, e103376.
31. University of Otago and Ministry of Health (2011) A Focus on Nutrition: Key Findings of the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey. Wellington: Ministry of Health.
32. Thompson, FE & Byers, T (1994) Dietary assessment resource manual. J Nutr 124, 2245S2317S.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed