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Comment on Sergeant et al.: Impact of methods used to express levels of circulating fatty acids on the degree and direction of associations with blood lipids in humans

  • Anne J. Wanders (a1), Marjan Alssema (a1) (a2) (a3), Marleen J. van Greevenbroek (a4), Amany Elshorbagy (a5), Peter L. Zock (a1), Jacqueline M. Dekker (a2) (a3) and Ingeborg A. Brouwer (a2) (a6)...
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      Comment on Sergeant et al.: Impact of methods used to express levels of circulating fatty acids on the degree and direction of associations with blood lipids in humans
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      Comment on Sergeant et al.: Impact of methods used to express levels of circulating fatty acids on the degree and direction of associations with blood lipids in humans
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References

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1. Sergeant, S, Ruczinski, I, Ivester, P, et al. (2016) Impact of methods used to express levels of circulating fatty acids on the degree and direction of associations with blood lipids in humans. Br J Nutr 115, 251261.
2. Bradbury, KE, Skeaff, CM, Green, TJ, et al. (2010) The serum fatty acids myristic acid and linoleic acid are better predictors of serum cholesterol concentrations when measured as molecular percentages rather than as absolute concentrations. Am J Clin Nutr 91, 398405.
3. Hodson, L, Skeaff, CM & Fielding, BA (2008) Fatty acid composition of adipose tissue and blood in humans and its use as a biomarker of dietary intake. Prog Lipid Res 47, 348380.
4. Reinders, I, van Ballegooijen, AJ, Visser, M, et al. (2013) Associations of serum n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids with echocardiographic measures among older adults: the Hoorn study. Eur J Clin Nutr 67, 12771283.
5. Van Woudenbergh, GJ, Kuijsten, A, Van der Kallen, CJ, et al. (2012) Comparison of fatty acid proportions in serum cholesteryl esters among people with different glucose tolerance status: the CoDAM study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 22, 133140.
6. Mensink, RP, Zock, PL, Kester, AD, et al. (2003) Effects of dietary fatty acids and carbohydrates on the ratio of serum total to HDL cholesterol and on serum lipids and apolipoproteins: a meta-analysis of 60 controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr 77, 11461155.
7. Jerneren, F, Elshorbagy, AK, Oulhaj, A, et al. (2015) Brain atrophy in cognitively impaired elderly: the importance of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and B vitamin status in a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr 102, 215221.

Comment on Sergeant et al.: Impact of methods used to express levels of circulating fatty acids on the degree and direction of associations with blood lipids in humans

  • Anne J. Wanders (a1), Marjan Alssema (a1) (a2) (a3), Marleen J. van Greevenbroek (a4), Amany Elshorbagy (a5), Peter L. Zock (a1), Jacqueline M. Dekker (a2) (a3) and Ingeborg A. Brouwer (a2) (a6)...

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