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Cholesterol and egg intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study

  • Kayo Kurotani (a1), Akiko Nanri (a1), Atsushi Goto (a2), Tetsuya Mizoue (a1), Mitsuhiko Noda (a2), Shino Oba (a3), Norie Sawada (a4), Shoichiro Tsugane (a4) and for the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Group...

Abstract

Limited and inconsistent associations between cholesterol and egg consumption and type 2 diabetes risk have been observed in Western countries. In the present study, the association of dietary cholesterol and egg intakes with type 2 diabetes risk was examined prospectively. The study subjects comprised 27 248 men and 36 218 women aged 45–75 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study and had no histories of type 2 diabetes or other serious diseases. Dietary cholesterol and egg intakes were estimated using a validated 147-item FFQ. The OR of self-reported, physician-diagnosed type 2 diabetes over 5 years were estimated using multiple logistic regression. A total of 1165 newly diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes were self-reported. Although dietary cholesterol intake was not associated with type 2 diabetes risk in men, it was found to be associated with a 23 % lower odds of type 2 diabetes risk in women in the highest quartile of intake, albeit not statistically significant, compared with those in the lowest quartile (P trend= 0·08). Such risk reduction was somewhat greater among postmenopausal women; the multivariable-adjusted OR for the highest quartile of cholesterol intake compared with the lowest quartile was 0·68 (95 % CI 0·49, 0·94; P trend= 0·04). No association between egg intake and type 2 diabetes risk was found in either men or women. In conclusion, higher intake of cholesterol or eggs may not be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese populations. The observed association between decreased type 2 diabetes risk and higher dietary cholesterol intake in postmenopausal women warrants further investigation.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr K. Kurotani, fax +81 3 3202 7364, email kkurotani@ri.ncgm.go.jp

References

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Keywords

Cholesterol and egg intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study

  • Kayo Kurotani (a1), Akiko Nanri (a1), Atsushi Goto (a2), Tetsuya Mizoue (a1), Mitsuhiko Noda (a2), Shino Oba (a3), Norie Sawada (a4), Shoichiro Tsugane (a4) and for the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Group...

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