Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

‘Visible incarnations of the unseen’: Henry Drummond and the practice of typological exegesis

  • ANNE SCOTT (a1)

Abstract

Although Henry Drummond's Natural Law in the Spiritual World (1883) is frequently cited by historians in relation to the impact of evolutionary theories on the Victorian churches, attention has not been paid to the audiences of working-class men in Glasgow for whom the papers were originally constructed. By drawing upon the notebook in which the author sketched out the series of addresses, in addition to materials relating to the interpretative habits of these audiences; I am able to consider the text as a work of practical apologetics rather than as a contribution to elite intellectual debate. This paper promises to open up new lines of enquiry with regard to the materials with which working-class audiences attempted to construct their own interpretations of contemporary scientific and religious issues. It also highlights Drummond's hitherto unrecognized use of specific practices of biblical exegesis and his debt to the work of the anatomist Richard Owen which, by keeping different forms of life distinct, and explaining organization as the effect of life already present, allowed the author to visualize the process of descent in terms of an inherent tendency to change in line with the unfolding of a pre-existing plan.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      ‘Visible incarnations of the unseen’: Henry Drummond and the practice of typological exegesis
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      ‘Visible incarnations of the unseen’: Henry Drummond and the practice of typological exegesis
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      ‘Visible incarnations of the unseen’: Henry Drummond and the practice of typological exegesis
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Footnotes

Hide All
I am especially grateful to Professor Crosbie Smith who supervised the Ph.D. thesis on part of which this paper is based. The incisive comments of Professor David N. Livingstone, Alex Dolby and Dr Philip Boobbyer are acknowledged with thanks. I am also grateful for the suggestions, made by two anonymous referees, on an earlier draft. I would also like to acknowledge the help of the archivists in the National Library of Scotland and the libraries of the University of Edinburgh. For a more detailed version of the argument set forth here see Anne Scott, ‘Practices of witnessing in Victorian science and religion: the heresy trial of William Robertson Smith and the development of Henry Drummond's evolutionary “Scientific Theology”’, unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Kent, 2002, esp. Chapters 2 and 5.

Footnotes

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed