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Brain imaging in psychiatric disorders: target or screen?

  • Thomas Rego (a1) and Dennis Velakoulis (a2)

Abstract

Summary

There is currently debate about when a clinician should consider neuroimaging for patients with a known psychiatric illness. We consider this topic and propose a set of ‘red flags’ to use to aid decision-making.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Thomas Rego. Neuropsychiatry Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital Level 2, John Cade Building Grattan Street, Parkville VIC 3052, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Email: thomas.rego@mh.org.au

References

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2Lubman, DI, Velakoulis, D, McGorry, PD, Smith, DJ, Brewer, W, Stuart, G, et al. Incidental radiological findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging in first-episode psychosis and chronic schizophrenia. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2002; 106: 331–6.
3Goulet, K, Deschamps, B, Evoy, F, Trudel, JF. Use of brain imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) in first-episode psychosis: review and retrospective study. Can J Psychiatry 2009; 54: 493501.
4Katzman, GL, Dagher, AP, Patronas, NJ. Incidental findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging from 1000 asymptomatic volunteers. JAMA 1999; 282: 3639.
5Canadian Psychiatric Association. Clinical practice guidelines: treatment of schizophrenia. Can J Psychiatry 2005; 50: 7–57S.
6National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Structural Neuroimaging in First-Episode Psychosis. Technology Appraisal Guidance. NICE, 2008.
7American Psychiatric Association. Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Schizophrenia (2nd edn). APA, 2010.
8Galletly, C, Castle, D, Dark, F, Humberstone, V, Jablensky, A, Killackey, E, et al. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the management of schizophrenia and related disorders. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2016; 50: 410–72.

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Brain imaging in psychiatric disorders: target or screen?

  • Thomas Rego (a1) and Dennis Velakoulis (a2)
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