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Venous thromboembolism risk in psychiatric in-patients: a multicentre cross-sectional study

  • Natalie Ellis (a1), Carla-Marie Grubb (a1), Sophie Mustoe (a2), Eleanor Watkins (a3), David Codling (a4), Sarah Fitch (a5), Lucy Stirland (a6), Munzir Quraishy (a1), Josie Jenkinson (a7) and Judith Harrison (a8)...

Abstract

Aims and method

We assessed venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk, barriers to prescribing VTE prophylaxis and completion of VTE risk assessment in psychiatric in-patients. This was a cross-sectional study conducted across three centres. We used the UK Department of Health VTE risk assessment tool which had been adapted for psychiatric patients.

Results

Of the 470 patients assessed, 144 (30.6%) were at increased risk of VTE. Patients on old age wards were more likely to be at increased risk than those on general adult wards (odds ratio = 2.26, 95% CI 1.51–3.37). Of those at higher risk of VTE, auditors recorded concerns about prescribing prophylaxis in 70 patients (14.9%). Only 20 (4.3%) patients had a completed risk assessment.

Clinical implications

Mental health in-patients are likely to be at increased risk of VTE. VTE risk assessment is not currently embedded in psychiatric in-patient care. There is a need for guidance specific to this population.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Carla-Marie Grubb (grubbC3@cardiff.ac.uk)

Footnotes

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These authors contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

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Venous thromboembolism risk in psychiatric in-patients: a multicentre cross-sectional study

  • Natalie Ellis (a1), Carla-Marie Grubb (a1), Sophie Mustoe (a2), Eleanor Watkins (a3), David Codling (a4), Sarah Fitch (a5), Lucy Stirland (a6), Munzir Quraishy (a1), Josie Jenkinson (a7) and Judith Harrison (a8)...
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