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Pathways to Recovery: development and evaluation of a cognitive–behavioural therapy in-patient treatment programme for adults with anorexia nervosa

  • Andrea Brown (a1), Richard Jenkinson (a2), Julia Coakes (a3), Annette Cockfield (a3), Tish O'Brien (a1) and Louise Hall (a1)...

Abstract

Aims and method

A cognitive–behavioural therapy in-patient treatment model for adults with severe anorexia nervosa was developed and evaluated, and outcomes were compared with the previous treatment model and other published outcomes from similar settings.

Results

This study showed the Pathways to Recovery outcomes were positive in terms of improvements in body mass index and psychopathology.

Clinical implications

Adults with anorexia nervosa can achieve good outcomes despite longer illness duration and comorbidities.

Declaration of interest

A.B., A.C. and L.H. work at The Retreat where the Pathways to Recovery were developed.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Andrea Brown (abrown@theretreatyork.org.uk)

References

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Pathways to Recovery: development and evaluation of a cognitive–behavioural therapy in-patient treatment programme for adults with anorexia nervosa

  • Andrea Brown (a1), Richard Jenkinson (a2), Julia Coakes (a3), Annette Cockfield (a3), Tish O'Brien (a1) and Louise Hall (a1)...
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