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Online mood monitoring in treatment-resistant depression: qualitative study of patients' perspectives in the NHS

  • Emma Incecik (a1), Rachael W. Taylor (a1) (a2), Beatrice Valentini (a1) (a3), Stephani L. Hatch (a1) (a2), John R. Geddes (a4) (a5), Anthony J. Cleare (a1) (a2) (a6) and Lindsey Marwood (a1) (a6)...

Abstract

Aims and method

True Colours is an automated symptom monitoring programme used by National Health Service psychiatric services. This study explored whether patients with unipolar treatment-resistant depression (TRD) found this a useful addition to their treatment regimes. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 21 patients with TRD, who had engaged in True Colours monitoring as part of the Lithium versus Quetiapine in Depression study. A thematic analysis was used to assess participant experiences of the system.

Results

Six main themes emerged from the data, the most notable indicating that mood monitoring increased patients' insight into their disorder, but that subsequent behaviour change was absent.

Clinical implications

Patients with TRD can benefit from mood monitoring via True Colours, making it a worthwhile addition to treatment. Further development of such systems and additional support may be required for patients with TRD to experience further benefits as reported by other patient groups.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Rachael W. Taylor (rachael.taylor@kcl.ac.uk)

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest: In the past 3 years, A.J.C. has received honoraria for speaking from Astra Zeneca and Lundbeck; honoraria for consulting from Allergan, Janssen, Livanova and Lundbeck; support for conference attendance from Janssen and research grant support from the Medical Research Council (MRC), Wellcome and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). S.L.H. has received grant support from Wellcome Trust, NIHR, Department of Health and Social Care, MRC, Guy's and St Thomas' Charity, and the Economic and Social Research Council. J.R.G. led the conception of True Colours and has overseen its implementation in routine clinical practice and research studies. He is an NIHR senior investigator and has received research funding from MRC, Wellcome and NIHR. No other authors report any conflicts of interest, although E.I. conducted some of the interviews as part of her master's dissertation project.

*

These authors contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

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Online mood monitoring in treatment-resistant depression: qualitative study of patients' perspectives in the NHS

  • Emma Incecik (a1), Rachael W. Taylor (a1) (a2), Beatrice Valentini (a1) (a3), Stephani L. Hatch (a1) (a2), John R. Geddes (a4) (a5), Anthony J. Cleare (a1) (a2) (a6) and Lindsey Marwood (a1) (a6)...

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Online mood monitoring in treatment-resistant depression: qualitative study of patients' perspectives in the NHS

  • Emma Incecik (a1), Rachael W. Taylor (a1) (a2), Beatrice Valentini (a1) (a3), Stephani L. Hatch (a1) (a2), John R. Geddes (a4) (a5), Anthony J. Cleare (a1) (a2) (a6) and Lindsey Marwood (a1) (a6)...
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