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Evidence-based mental health and e-learning: a guide for clinicians

  • Katharine A. Smith, André Tomlin, Andrea Cipriani and John R. Geddes

Summary

The internet provides access to what is often a bewildering array of medical knowledge on mental health, some (but not all) of which is evidence based. As well as information for clinicians, there has been a dramatic increase in the variety and quality of information available for patients and carers. In this article we discuss the advantages and limitations of the types of information available, with suggested sites and strategies for assessing their relative merits.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Katharine Smith, NIHR Oxford cognitive health Clinical Research Facility, Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK. Email: katharine.smith@psych.ox.ac.uk

Footnotes

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LEARNING OBJECTIVES

• Understand the different types of e-learning available and their relative advantages and disadvantages

• Be aware of the need to assess the quality of each source of e-learning and the availability of assessment tools to do this

• Gain a working knowledge of terms used in e-learning, their uses and applications

DECLARATION OF INTEREST

AT. is Managing Director of Minervation Ltd.

Footnotes

References

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Evidence-based mental health and e-learning: a guide for clinicians

  • Katharine A. Smith, André Tomlin, Andrea Cipriani and John R. Geddes
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