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Training the Wider Workforce in Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help: The SPIRIT (Structured Psychosocial InteRventions in Teams) Training Course

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 August 2010

Chris Williams
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow, UK
Rebeca Martinez
Affiliation:
University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, UK
Rebecca Dafters
Affiliation:
Strathdoon House, Ayr, UK
Lisa Ronald
Affiliation:
Nottingham Trent Trust, UK
Anne Garland
Affiliation:
Gartnavel Royal Hospital, Glasgow, UK
Corresponding

Abstract

Background: The use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) self-help materials for depression is increasingly recommended as part of stepped care service models. Such resources can be delivered by both new specialist workers (such as the IAPT services in England), or by introducing this style of working into an existing workforce as described in the current paper. The Structured Psychosocial InteRventions in Teams (SPIRIT) course consists of 38.5 hours of workshops, and 5 hours of clinical supervision in the use of CBT self-help (CBSH). Method: This study describes an evaluation of the effectiveness of the course when offered to community and inpatient mental health staff from a wide range of adult and older adult mental health teams in NHS Greater Glasgow Mental Health Division. Results: Training resulted in both subjective and objective knowledge and skills gains at the end of training that were largely sustained 3 months later. At that time point, 40% of staff still reported use of CBSH in the last week. Satisfaction with the training is high, using validated rating scales. Conclusions: The SPIRIT training has gone some way to increasing access to CBSH for use in everyday clinical practice.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2010

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Training the Wider Workforce in Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help: The SPIRIT (Structured Psychosocial InteRventions in Teams) Training Course
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