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Tool use and constructions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Michael A. Arbib
Affiliation:
Computer Science, Neuroscience, and USC Brain Project, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2520. arbib@usc.eduhttp://www.usc.edu/programs/neuroscience/faculty/profile.php?fid=16

Abstract

We examine tool use in relation to the capacity of animals for construction, contrasting tools and nests; place human tool use in a more general problem-solving context, revisiting the body schema in the process; and relate the evolution of language and of tool use.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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References

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