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Technological selection: A missing link

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Peter B. Crabb
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University Hazleton, Hazleton, PA 18202. pbc1@psu.edu

Abstract

Vaesen's description of uniquely human tool-related cognitive abilities rings true but would be enhanced by an account of how those abilities would have evolved. I suggest that a process of technological selection operated on the cognitive architecture of ancestral hominids because they, unlike other tool-using species, depended on tools for their survival.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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